Letter to Joseph Trumbull

Eliphalet Dyer

June 17, 1775

 

Dear Sir,

I have wrote you 2 or 3 letters since I receivd any from you. My last was by Doctor Church. I yesterday wrote to Genll Spencer which he will shew you. This is only private. You will hear that Coll Washington is Appointed Genll or Commander in Chief Over the Continental Army by I dont know but the Universal Voice of the Congress. I believe he will be Very Agreable to our officers & Soldiery. He is a Gent. highly Esteemed by those acquainted with him, tho I dont believe as to his Military, & for real service he knows more than some of ours, but so it removes all jealousies, more firmly Cements the Southern to the Northern, and takes away the fear of the former lest an Enterprising eastern New England Genll proving Successfull, might with his Victorious Army give law to the Southern & Western Gentry. This made it absolutely Necessary in point of prudence, but he is Clever, & if any thing too modest. He seems discret & Virtuous, no harum Starum ranting Swearing fellow but Sober, steady, & Calm. His modesty will Induce him I dare say to take & order every step with the best advice possible to be obtained in the Army. His allowance for Wages expences & every thing is we think very high, not less than £150 lawll per month, but it was urged that the largeness of his family, Aide Camps, Secretary Servts &c, beside a Constant table for more or less of his officers, daily expresses, dispatches &c Must be very expensive. There is an allowance of 63 dollars per month for his Secretary who is to be Considered as one of his (the Genlls) family, every way provided for by the Genll so as to have no expence for the Secretary. I have so without your knowledge or Consent been laying in for that birth for you. I first mentioned it to Mr Dean. He appeared ready & Chearfull to give all his assistance. Mr Jno Adams & some others of Massachusetts I think they will favor it. Genll. Washington has been spoke to on the occasion, as I thot it would be a Clever genteel Birth, the Wages tollerable considering no expence for living. I believe you will much esteem him & believe he will be pleased with you. I dare say you may live Very happy with him. It is not Certain as yet it can be accomplished but if I knew it would be agreable I should leave no stone unturned to Accomplish it. A line from you as soon as possible would be very agreable tho cannot expect it before he will set out. In the mean time shall use our best Indeavers & tis but to refuse if you do not choose it if offerd. We hope to supply the Army with Six or 8 hundred fine Paxten boys & other riflers from the back of this Province some from Virginia. I hope they will arrive before Geniis How & Burgoyne Attempt to give you a Confounded flogging & which they will do if you are not well on your Guard & manage them right when they do come. Regards respects Compliments &c as usual from your most sincere friend &c.

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