Fall 2014 (Live Online Courses)

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Fall 2014 Session 2 (Online)

October 11 to December 6

AHG 502 O2A: The American Founding (2)  ** CLOSED **

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: Scott Yenor, Boise State University

Schedule: Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course MaterialsSyllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

Textbooks: 

AHG 504 O2A: Civil War and Reconstruction (2)

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war Amendments and the Reconstruction era.

InstructorDan Monroe, Millikin University

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course MaterialsSyllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

Textbooks:

AHG 510 O2B: Great American Texts—The Lincoln-Douglas Debates (2)

After a brief survey of 19th century American politics and its relationship to the Founding, we will cover all seven Lincoln-Douglas debates, studying one debate per class. We will assess the arguments and rhetoric of both ambitious party leaders and place the debates in the larger context of American political and constitutional history, looking forward to the presidential election of 1860. Besides clarifying Lincoln’s thought and political tactics, we will examine Stephen Douglas’s role in what remains today the world’s oldest political party, his expansionist foreign policy, and his views of federalism, slavery, and popular sovereignty, among other major concerns of antebellum America. What might the debates teach us about American politics today?

Instructors: Ken Masugi, Johns Hopkins University

Schedule: Wednesday, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

Textbooks: 

AHG 510 O2C: Great American Texts—American Lives (2)

This seminar will examine four great American autobiographies: Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, and Calvin Coolidge. As we examine these works, we will examine the author’s understanding of self-government, American political principles, the American mind, and the American character.

Instructors: Peter W. Schramm, Ashland University

Schedule: Tuesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course MaterialsSyllabus There is no course packet for this course.

Textbooks:

AHG 606 O2A: America between World Wars (2)

In the 1920s, changes in America that had been underway for several decades came fully into view. This is the period when cultural wars first appeared (e.g., The Scopes Trial) and the transformative effects of industrial capitalism touched every part of American life. In the 1930s, an economic crisis challenged received views of the proper relationship of the government to the economy. The course examines various political and economic changes that occurred in this period, with a special emphasis on the New Deal.

Instructors: David Krugler, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Schedule: Mondays and Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course MaterialsSyllabus  Course Packet

Textbooks: There are no required textbooks for this course.

AHG 620 O2A: The Reform Tradition in America (2)

America has lived through three periods of sustained interest in reforming its political and social life, the first in the decades preceding the Civil War, the second in the decades preceding the First World War and the third in the decade or two following World War II. The course examines aspects of these reform movements, particularly their connection to religion and Protestant theology.

InstructorsEmily Hess, Ashland University

Schedule: Mondays, 8:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course MaterialsSyllabus  Course Packet

Textbooks:

AHG 632 O2A: The American Presidency I–Washington to Lincoln (2)

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from the Founding era through the Civil War. It focuses on how the presidency shaped American political life as the country grew and struggled with rising sectional tensions.

Instructors: Scot Zentner, California State University-San Bernardino

Schedule: Tuesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course MaterialsSyllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

Textbooks:

AHG 660 O2A: The Vietnam War (2)  ** CLOSED **

This course examines the origins, progress, and outcome of the Vietnam War from 1945 through 1975. This class is taught primarily through the close examination of documents with an emphasis on the changes that took place in American culture – politically, socially, intellectually, and militarily – as a result.

Instructors: William Atto, University of Dallas

Schedule: Mondays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course MaterialsSyllabus  There is no course packet for this course.

Textbooks:

Fall 2014 Session 1 (Online)

August 16 to October 10

AHG 501 O1A: The American Revolution (2)  ** CLOSED **

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: Robert M.S. McDonald, United States Military Academy

Schedule: Thursdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course MaterialsSyllabus  Course Packet

Textbooks: 

AHG 503 O1A: Sectionalism and Civil War (2)  ** CLOSED **

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Lucas Morel, Washington & Lee University

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course MaterialsSyllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet (revised 7/24/14)

Textbooks: 

AHG 505 O1A: The Progressive Era (2)  ** CLOSED **

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructors: Christopher Burkett, Ashland University

Schedule: Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course MaterialsSyllabus  Course Packet

Textbooks:

AHG 510 O1A: Great American Texts—Moby-Dick (2)

Moby-Dick; or, The Whale is not only a classic work in American literature but a thorough political analysis of both the virtues and limitations of American democracy. While at at times, Melville expresses hopeful confidence in his country’s national purpose, Moby-Dick also provides some well-founded skepticism about the coherence of American political life in practice. In Moby-Dick Melville confronts a tension inherent in the two principles that define the American regime: human rights founded in nature and the democratic imperative of popular consent. If consent is always necessary to the government of the nation, what can be done when the people themselves lack the virtue to protect those natural rights? The journey on the Pequod, therefore, is more than just a whaling adventure; it is Melville’s attempt to understand how the nation can reconcile its fundamental principles of government.

Instructors: J. David Alvis, Wofford College

Schedule: Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course MaterialsSyllabus  There is no course packet for this course.

Textbooks:

AHG 642 O1A: Political Parties (2)  ** CLOSED **

This course examines the development of American political parties, focusing on the meaning of parties and historic moments in the rise and fall of political parties from the Founding era to the present. Topics may include re-aligning elections, changing coalitions within American parties, and the contemporary Democratic and Republican parties.

Instructors: Eric C. Sands, Berry College

Schedule: Tuesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course MaterialsSyllabus  Course Packet

Textbooks:

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