Menu

Fall 2015 (Live Online Courses)

Register Now | Previous Courses | Request More Info

Fall 2015 Session 2 (Online)

October 17 to December 12

AHG 503 O2A: Sectionalism and Civil War (2) ** COURSE CLOSED **

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Joseph Fornieri (Rochester Institute of Technology)

ScheduleMondays and Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 10:00 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 503 O2B: Sectionalism and Civil War (2)  New! Course Added on 7/28/15 ** COURSE CLOSED **

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: S. Adam Seagrave (Northern Illinois University)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 505 O2B: The Progressive Era (2)  New! Course Added on 7/28/15 ** COURSE CLOSED **

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: William Atto (University of Dallas)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 510 O2A: Great American Texts – Ralph Ellison (2) ** COURSE CLOSED **

Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952) is the great American novel about race, perhaps even the great American novel. It considers and affirms the principle—that “mysterious binding force”—that holds us together as a people and that is tied to our own history. In doing so it raises all the important political questions about equality, freedom, rights and justice; the legacy of slavery and white supremacy, our “human and absurd diversity.” The novel’s deliberate attempt, in Ellison’s words, “to return to the mood of personal moral responsibility for democracy” makes perfectly clear the connection between literature and politics. The seminar will also consider a few of Ellison’s essays bearing directly on Invisible Man.

Instructor: Lucas E. Morel (Washington and Lee University)

ScheduleTuesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 510 O2B: Great American Texts – Martin Luther King, Jr. (2) ** COURSE CLOSED **

Standing under the immortalized gaze of Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King, Jr., told his fellow Americans, “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” With those words he epitomized the longings of a century-old struggle for equal rights, and he also provided the most memorable expression of the meaning and mission of America since the Gettysburg Address. In this course we undertake a close analysis of that and other speeches, writings, and major sermons by King, to the end of understanding how, and how far, King’s core ideas—concerning justice and law, liberty and democracy, race and humanity, even sin and redemption—constitute, as he says, “a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.”

Instructor: Peter C. Myers (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire)

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 620 O2A: The Reform Tradition in America (2) ** COURSE CLOSED **

America has lived through three periods of sustained interest in reforming its political and social life, the first in the decades preceding the Civil War, the second in the decades preceding the First World War and the third in the decade or two following World War II. The course examines aspects of these reform movements, particularly their connection to religion and Protestant theology.

InstructorDavid C. Tucker (Ashland University)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 631 O2A: American Political Rhetoric (2) ** COURSE CLOSED **

This course examines American political rhetoric in its broadest sense as the art of political persuasion and civic education. Surveying the field from the Founders through Barack Obama, we will engage in a careful reading of the speeches and writings of leading statesmen, including Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, FDR, JFK, Ronald Reagan, and Barack Obama. We will attempt to understand how their rhetorical techniques contributed to their respective successes.

Instructor: Ken Masugi (Johns Hopkins University)

ScheduleMondays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

AHG 642 O2A: Political Parties (2) ** COURSE CLOSED **

This course examines the development of American political parties, focusing on the meaning of parties and historic moments in the rise and fall of political parties from the Founding era to the present. Topics may include re-aligning elections, changing coalitions within American parties, and the contemporary Democratic and Republican parties.

Instructor: Scot Zentner (California State University, San Bernardino)

Schedule: Thursdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET (Note: this course does NOT meet on 11/26/15 but does meet on 12/17/15)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 660 O2A: War in Journalism and Literature in American History (2) ** COURSE CLOSED **

“The real war will never get in the books,” Walt Whitman famously wrote. That warning hasn’t prevented combatants, journalists, writers, and observers (including Whitman himself) from trying. In a survey of select wars in U.S. history, this course simultaneously examines news coverage of these conflicts and some of the novels, poetry, and memoirs they inspired. Is the truth of a warrior’s experience and memory best revealed through fiction? How have evolving journalistic standards and media (especially television) shaped coverage of war and public opinion throughout history? How has the relationship between war correspondents and combatants changed over time? How has the U.S. military balanced freedom of the press with the exigencies of war mobilization and operations? These are a few of the questions we will examine in the course.

Instructor: David F. Krugler (University of Wisconsin-Platteville)

ScheduleMondays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 660 O2B: The First Amendment (2) New! Course Added on 8/7/15  ** COURSE CLOSED **

This course is an intensive study of the ideas, politics, and history of the U.S. Supreme Court’s jurisprudence on the First Amendment.  Focused especially on the religion and speech clauses, the course considers the development of the Court’s opinions in light of the broader theoretical and institutional elements of American constitutionalism.

Instructor: Jason Jividen (Saint Vincent College)

Schedule: Thursdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET (Note: this course does NOT meet on 11/26/15 but does meet on 12/17/15)

Course Materials:

Fall 2015 Session 1 (Online)

August 22 to October 16

AHG 501 O1A: The American Revolution (2)  ** COURSE CLOSED **

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

InstructorEric Sands (Berry College)

Schedule: Mondays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course MaterialsSyllabus  Course Packet

AHG 502 O1A: The American Founding (2)  ** COURSE CLOSED **

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: J. David Alvis (Wofford College)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course MaterialsSyllabus  Course Packet

AHG 504 O1A: Civil War and Reconstruction (2) ** COURSE CLOSED **

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructor: Scott Yenor (Boise State University)

Schedule: Mondays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

AHG 505 O1A: The Progressive Era (2) ** COURSE CLOSED **

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: Christopher Burkett (Ashland University)

Schedule: Mondays and Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 10:00 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 603 O1A: Colonial America (2) ** COURSE CLOSED **

This course focuses on the development of an indigenous political culture in the British colonies. It pays special attention to the development of representative political institutions and how these emerged through the confrontation between colonists and King and proprietors. The course also considers imperial politics through a study of the Albany Plan of Union.

Instructor: Sarah Morgan Smith (Rutgers University) and David C. Tucker (Ashland University)

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 605 O1A: The Age of Enterprise (2) ** COURSE CLOSED **

In the last decades of the 19th Century, the United States took decisive steps away from its rural, agrarian past toward its industrial future, assuming its place among world powers. This course examines that movement, covering such topics as business-labor relations, political corruption, immigration, imperialism, the New South, and segregation and racism.

Instructor: Dan Monroe (Millikin University)

Schedule: Thursdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 633 O1A: The American Presidency II – Johnson to the present (2) ** COURSE CLOSED **

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from Reconstruction to the present. It focuses on how changing conceptions of the presidency have shaped American political life in the 19th and 20th centuries, especially as America has become a global power.

Instructor: Jeremy Bailey (University of Houston)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Register Now | Previous Courses | Request More Info

Get Email Updates

TeachingAmericanHistory.org is a project of the Ashbrook Center at Ashland University

401 College Avenue | Ashland, Ohio 44805 (419) 289-5411 | (877) 289-5411 (Toll Free)

info@TeachingAmericanHistory.org