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Fall 2018 Schedule

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 Fall 2018 Session 1 (Online)

August 25 to October 19

AHG 501 O1A: The American Revolution (2)

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: Eric C. Sands (Berry College)

Schedule: Mondays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 502 O1A: The American Founding (2)

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: Jason W. Stevens (Ashland University)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 503 O1A: Sectionalism and Civil War (2)

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Lucas E. Morel (Washington & Lee University)

Schedule: Mondays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 505 O1A: The Progressive Era (2)

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: Lauren K. Hall (Rochester Institute of Technology)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 506 O1A: The Rise of Modern America, 1914-1945 (2)

With the exception of the Civil War era, it is difficult to find another thirty-year period in U.S. history during which the nation underwent such dramatic change. In 1914 the United States was no more than a regional power, with a primarily rural demography and a relatively unobtrusive federal government. Thanks to the experience of two world wars, a major cultural conflict (the 1920s), and a disastrous economic crisis the country was transformed into the global economic and military power that it remains to this day. This course will examine the cultural, economic, military, and diplomatic events and trends of the period 1914-1945.

Instructor: Eric Pullin (Carthage College)

Schedule: Thursdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 510 O1A: Great American Texts – Franklin’s Autobiography and Bellow’s The Adventures of Augie March (2)

Benjamin Franklin has been called an “American model.” Saul Bellow’s novel begins with the line, “I am an American.” What do these texts tell us about what it means to be American? What do they reveal about “self-made” individuals and the qualities they possess? What political factors provide opportunities for them to be “self-made” and successful? What other American qualities do Franklin and Augie March have in common? This course will explore these and other questions through a careful reading of two important American texts./p>

Instructor: Christopher C. Burkett (Ashland University)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 7:15 pm to 10:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 621 O1A: Race and Equality in America (2)

This course explores the history of black Americans as they strove to secure their dignity as human beings, and rights as American citizens, in the face of racial prejudice. Students will examine the writings of leading black intellectuals and activists about human equality, slavery, self-government, the rule of law, emancipation, colonization, and citizenship. The course will also review laws, constitutional amendments, court cases, and social criticism addressing civil and political rights in America.

Instructor: Peter C. Myers (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire)

Schedule: Mondays and Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 9:50 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 632 O1A: The American Presidency I: Washington to Lincoln (2)

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from the Founding era through the Civil War. It focuses on how the presidency shaped American political life as the country grew and struggled with rising sectional tensions.

Instructor: J. David Alvis (Wofford College)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 660 O1A: The Vietnam War (2)

This course examines the origins, progress, and outcome of the Vietnam War from 1945 through 1975. This class is taught primarily through the close examination of documents with an emphasis on the changes that took place in American culture – politically, socially, intellectually, and militarily – as a result.

Instructor: William J. Atto (University of Dallas)

Schedule: Thursdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

Fall 2018 Session 2 (Online)

October 20 to December 15

AHG 502 O2B: The American Founding (2)

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: Scott E. Yenor (Boise State University)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 503 O2B: Sectionalism and Civil War (2)

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Dennis K. Boman (Lindenwood University)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 505 O2B: The Progressive Era (2)

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: Jason R. Jividen (Saint Vincent College)

Schedule: Mondays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 506 O2B: The Rise of Modern America, 1914-1945 (2)

With the exception of the Civil War era, it is difficult to find another thirty-year period in U.S. history during which the nation underwent such dramatic change. In 1914 the United States was no more than a regional power, with a primarily rural demography and a relatively unobtrusive federal government. Thanks to the experience of two world wars, a major cultural conflict (the 1920s), and a disastrous economic crisis the country was transformed into the global economic and military power that it remains to this day. This course will examine the cultural, economic, military, and diplomatic events and trends of the period 1914-1945.

Instructor: Gregory L. Schneider (Emporia State University)

Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:15 pm to 9:50 pm ET

(NOTE: This course will meet from 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET on Tuesday, November 20th; it will not meet on Thursday, November 22nd).

Course Materials:

AHG 510 O2B: Great American Texts: Uncle Tom’s Cabin (2)

This course illuminates one area of American political thought. The topic will be Harriet Stowe’s moral account of freedom and the reasoning associated with it. The focus will be on Uncle Tom’s Cabin, albeit referencing several of Stowe’s writings. We will establish a context for the discussion by reviewing Frederick Douglass’s powerful question, “What country have I?”, and the political, religious, and cultural contexts in which Uncle Tom’s Cabin was written. The goal is to understand just how Stowe came to formulate her ideas and why she had the impact on American society that she did. Also to be considered is whether the philosophical ideas that informed her work bear any direct responsibility for the political events that unfolded as a result of her work.

Instructor: William B. Allen (Michigan State University)

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 660 O2B: The Fourteenth Amendment (2)

This course will study the Supreme Court’s Fourteenth Amendment jurisprudence on due process, equal protection, and privileges or immunities from the 1860s to the present. It will analyze the evolution of the court’s doctrines on liberty of contract, voting rights, racial equality, sex discrimination, privacy, and parental rights.

Instructor: Joshua M. Dunn (University of Colorado-Colorado Springs)

Schedule: Mondays, 7:15 pm to 10:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 660 O2C: The United States since the 1960s (2)

The 1960s are rightly recognized as a watershed moment in U.S. history, yet the profound and often tumultuous changes of these years had lasting effects. The Civil Rights and women’s movements continued, and they inspired equality campaigns for other Americans (Native Americans, for example). Growing opposition to Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society and liberal governing principles in general revitalized conservatism, bringing the Reagan Revolution. American power appeared diminished by the Vietnam War, yet the U.S. remained committed to global leadership. The end of the Cold War, wars in the Middle East, and terrorism tested and changed U.S. foreign and military policies. This course will examine the United States as its people and government responded to domestic and global challenges, crises, and changes occurring during the last quarter of the twentieth century and the start of the twenty-first century.

Instructor: David F. Krugler (University of Wisconsin-Platteville)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 660 O2D: The Bible in America (2)

In this course, we will explore the recurring use of Biblical allusions, tropes, and types as ways of shaping and understanding American public life from the colonial period through the present day. Our sources will include sermons, political speeches, newspaper and magazine articles, as well as art, poetry, and literature. Major themes will include: the meaning of the Exodus narrative for the Puritans as well as for the African-American church; Biblical texts used to justify pacifism, civil disobedience and even revolution; the evocation of Jeremiad and Nehemiad motifs from the seventeenth through twenty-first centuries; the idea of America as a “redeemer nation” and the role of Scripture in the writings of key American presidents such as Washington, Lincoln, Kennedy, and Obama; and the use of Biblical texts in the fight for gender equity.

Instructor: Sarah Morgan Smith (Ashbrook Center at Ashland University)

Schedule: Mondays and Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 9:50 pm ET

Course Materials:

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