Spring 2014

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Spring 2014 Session 2 (Online)

March 8 to May 3

AHG 501 O2A: The American Revolution (2)  **COURSE CLOSED**

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: David Tucker, Naval Postgraduate School

Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:15 pm to 10:00 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Required Texts:

AHG 504 O2A: Civil War and Reconstruction (2) **COURSE CLOSED**

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructor: Dan Monroe, Millikin University

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

Required Texts:

AHG 504 O2B: Civil War and Reconstruction (2)

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructor: Stephen Tootle, College of the Sequoias

Schedule: Thursdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Required Texts:

AHG 631 O2A: American Political Rhetoric (2)

This course examines American political rhetoric in its broadest sense as the art of political persuasion and civic education. Surveying the field from the Founders through Barack Obama, we will engage in a careful reading of the speeches of leading statesmen, including Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, FDR, JFK, and Ronald Reagan. We will pay close attention to these primary sources as the means of teaching the great political controversies of American history.

Instructor: Ken Masugi, Johns Hopkins University

Schedule: Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Required Text:

Required Film:

AHG 632 O2A: The American Presidency I–Washington to Lincoln (2)  **COURSE CLOSED**

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from the Founding era through the Civil War. It focuses on how the presidency shaped American political life as the country grew and struggled with rising sectional tensions.

Instructor: Stephen Knott, U.S. Naval War College

Schedule: Wednesdays, 7:15 pm to 10:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Required Texts:

AHG 660 O2A: The American Western (2) **COURSE CLOSED**

This course is an intensive study of several classic American Westerns, in both print and film. The American Western reflects something fundamental about both the American mind and the American regime. The Western’s emphasis on courage and self-reliance, for example, arises from that same American character that forms the basis of self-government. The American Western also raises important questions central to American political life, among which are the meaning of justice, equality, and liberty. This course will also address the question of how American politics both influences and is influenced by literature in the Western genre.

Instructor: Christopher Burkett, Ashland University

Schedule: Thursdays, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Required Texts:

Required Films:

AHG 660 O2B: The Idea of America (2) **COURSE CLOSED**

The Land of Opportunity. The World’s Policeman. The Arsenal of Democracy. The Last, Best Hope of Mankind. Novus Ordo Seclorum. The Great Satan. Land of the Free and Home of the Brave. Amerika. The Melting Pot. These, and several other sobriquets are meant to capture the essence of what America is or what America is said to represent. However illuminating these sobriquets are, there can be no better guide to understanding our democracy than Alexis de Tocqueville. Lest Democracy in America be more frequently cited than read and understood, this course seeks to grasp this book in all of its nuance and depth by making it the centerpiece of our encounter with the ideas of America and then we shall investigate the unraveling of the Tocquevillian consensus during the Twentieth Century.

Instructor: Scott Yenor, Boise State University

Schedule: Mondays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

Required Texts:

AHG 660 O2C: Citizen and Immigrant (2) **COURSE CLOSED**

This seminar will examine the distinctive and noble character of American citizenship.  Our citizenship is grounded in the natural rights of mankind–the electric cord that binds us, as Lincoln called it–and guarded by a written constitution. We have always received the stranger, both respectable and persecuted.  We have generously extended–more generously than any other country–the privileges of citizenship on an equal basis with the original inhabitants.

 Instructor: Peter Schramm, Ashland University

Schedule: Tuesdays, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Required Texts:

Spring 2014 Session 1 (Online)

January 6 to March 1

AHG 502 O1A: The American Founding (2)  **COURSE CLOSED***

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: J. David Alvis, Wofford College

Schedule: Wednesdays, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Required Texts:

AHG 503 O1A: Sectionalism and Civil War (2)  **COURSE CLOSED**

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Eric Sands, Berry College

Schedule: Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Required Texts:

AHG 505 O1A: The Progressive Era (2) **COURSE CLOSED**

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: William Atto, University of Dallas

Schedule: Tuesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Required Texts:

AHG 510 O1A: Great American Texts–Raymond Chandler (2)  **COURSE CLOSED**

This course examines some of the most well-known writings and films of Raymond Chandler, whom Evelyn Waugh, in the late 1940s, called ”the greatest living American novelist.” Chandler wrote seven novels (some made into films), and in each of them his hero is private detective Philip Marlowe and the setting is Los Angeles in the 1930s and 40s. Chandler’s hard-boiled crime fiction is distinctly American; he wrote in what he called “the American language”; he said of his hero that he is “the American mind”; and the image he created of the “mean streets” of Los Angeles says much about American society and the American Dream.

Instructor: Christopher Flannery, Azusa Pacific University

Schedule: Mondays, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

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AHG 510 O1B: Great American Texts–George F. Kennan (2)  **COURSE CLOSED**

George Frost Kennan (1904-2005) is best known as a theorist and practitioner of U.S. foreign relations and his ideas shaped US-Soviet relations in the post-war period.  However, he was also a remarkable man of letters, with a broad education, a perceptive eye, and an insightful mind.  In this course we will trace Kennan’s extraordinary life by studying his most noteworthy works, and explore how his ideas shaped the emergence of the United States as a world power.

Instructor: John Moser, Ashland University

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  There is no Course Packet for this course.

Required Texts:

AHG 604 O1A: The Early Republic (2)  **COURSE CLOSED**

Having adopted a form of government, the Americans had to make it work. This course examines their efforts to do so, as the Republic took shape amidst foreign dangers, political conflict, westward expansion and religious revivals.  In particular, the debates of the Hamiltonian and Jeffersonian factions, and the political parties that formed around them, are examined.

Instructor: Jeremy Bailey, University of Houston

Schedule: Mondays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  There is no Course Packet for this course.

Required Texts:

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