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Spring 2017 Schedule

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Spring 2017 Session 1 (Online)

January 9 to March 4

AHG 501 O1A: The American Revolution (2) ** CLOSED **

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: Robert M.S. McDonald (United States Military Academy)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 502 O1A: The American Founding (2) ** CLOSED **

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: S. Adam Seagrave (University of Missouri)

Schedule: Thursdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 503 O1A: Sectionalism and Civil War (2) ** CLOSED **

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Joseph Fornieri (Rochester Institute of Technology)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 506 O1A: The Rise of Modern America, 1914-1945 (2) ** CLOSED **

With the exception of the Civil War era, it is difficult to find another thirty-year period in U.S. history during which the nation underwent such dramatic change. In 1914 the United States was no more than a regional power, with a primarily rural demography and a relatively unobtrusive federal government. Thanks to the experience of two world wars, a major cultural conflict (the 1920s), and a disastrous economic crisis the country was transformed into the global economic and military power that it remains to this day. This course will examine the cultural, economic, military, and diplomatic events and trends of the period 1914-1945.

Instructor: David F. Krugler (University of Wisconsin-Platteville)

Schedule: Mondays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 510 O1A: Great American Texts – Literature of the Vietnam War (2)  ** CLOSED **

The Vietnam War was once thought to be emblematic of the social, political, and cultural problems of the United States in the 1960s. One of the biggest challenges when studying any era is to understand the problems of that era as the people of the day understood them. The material in this course examines the deeper lessons of the Vietnam War in its historical context and through the two most notable literary treatments of the war published in the 1950s. By studying what perceptive fiction writers believed before the 1960s and the conclusions of historians after the war concluded we may begin to learn the limitations of contemporary assessments of any notable event.

Instructor: Stephen Tootle (College of the Sequoias)

Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 pm to 7:05 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  There is no course packet for this course.

AHG 605 O1A: The Age of Enterprise (2)  ** CLOSED **

In the last decades of the 19th Century, the United States took decisive steps away from its rural, agrarian past toward its industrial future, assuming its place among world powers. This course examines that movement, covering such topics as business-labor relations, political corruption, immigration, imperialism, the New South, and segregation and racism.

Instructor: Dan Monroe (Millikin University)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 631 O1A: American Political Rhetoric (2)  ** CLOSED **

This course examines American political rhetoric in its broadest sense as the art of political persuasion and civic education. Surveying the field from the Founders through Barack Obama, we will engage in a careful reading of the speeches and writings of leading statesmen, including Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, FDR, JFK, Ronald Reagan, and Barack Obama. We will attempt to understand how their rhetorical techniques contributed to their respective successes.

Instructor: Ken Masugi (Johns Hopkins University)

Schedule: Mondays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

AHG 632 O1A: The American Presidency I – Washington to Lincoln (2) ** CLOSED **

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from the Founding era through the Civil War. It focuses on how the presidency shaped American political life as the country grew and struggled with rising sectional tensions.

Instructor: Scot Zentner (California State University, San Bernardino)

Schedule: Mondays and Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 7:50 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

AHG 660 O1A: Great American Texts – Tocqueville and Literature (2) ** CLOSED **

In Democracy in America, Tocqueville produced not only the best book ever written about democracy but also the best book ever written about America. In his seminal text, Tocqueville highlights many of the perennial issues and problems of democracy and emphasizes how those challenges have been confronted in the American context, both for better and for worse. Given Tocqueville’s importance for understanding the American regime, it should come as no surprise that many American novelists and writers have been influenced by Tocqueville’s analysis and have incorporated various aspects of his observations in their own writings about America. Through a critical examination of Tocqueville’s writings and the writings of selected American novelists, we will assess the enduring legacy of Tocqueville’s thought and what it means for America. We will also explore how American novelists bring Tocqueville’s ideas to life in a format that is more conducive to democratic tastes.

Instructor: Eric Sands (Berry College)

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  There is no course packet for this class.

Spring 2017 Session 2 (Online)

March 11 to May 6

AHG 501 O2B: The American Revolution (2) ** CLOSED **

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: Scott Yenor (Boise State University)

Schedule: Mondays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 502 O2B: The American Founding (2) ** CLOSED **

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: Jason W. Stevens (Ashland University)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 7:15 pm to 10:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 503 O2B: Sectionalism and Civil War (2) ** CLOSED **

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Dennis Boman (Lindenwood University)

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 505 O2A: The Progressive Era (2) ** CLOSED **

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: William Atto (University of Dallas)

Schedule: Mondays and Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 9:50 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 506 O2B: The Rise of Modern America, 1914-1945 (2) New! Added 1/19/2017

With the exception of the Civil War era, it is difficult to find another thirty-year period in U.S. history during which the nation underwent such dramatic change. In 1914 the United States was no more than a regional power, with a primarily rural demography and a relatively unobtrusive federal government. Thanks to the experience of two world wars, a major cultural conflict (the 1920s), and a disastrous economic crisis the country was transformed into the global economic and military power that it remains to this day. This course will examine the cultural, economic, military, and diplomatic events and trends of the period 1914-1945.

Instructor: Gregory Schneider (University of Wisconsin-Platteville)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 510 O2B: Great American Texts – Franklin’s Autobiography and Bellow’s The Adventures of Augie March (2) ** CLOSED **

Benjamin Franklin has been called an “American model.” Saul Bellow’s novel begins with the line, “I am an American.” What do these texts tell us about what it means to be American? What do they reveal about “self-made” individuals and the qualities they possess? What political factors provide opportunities for them to be “self-made” and successful? What other American qualities do Franklin and Augie March have in common? This course will explore these and other questions through a careful reading of two important American texts.

Instructor: Christopher Burkett (Ashland University)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 608 O2A:  Civil War and Reconstruction (2) ** CLOSED **

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war Amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Note: AHG 608 will satisfy the AHG 504 core requirement for those degree-seeking MAHG and MASTAHG students who began their studies prior to Fall 2016.

Instructor: Eric Sands (Berry College)

Schedule: Mondays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

AHG 610 O2A: American Foreign Policy since 1898 (2) ** CLOSED **

This course examines the international relations of the United States from the Spanish-American War to 9/11. The twentieth century marked the rise of the nation to a superpower with a myriad of global interests and commitments. Accordingly, students will examine foreign policy’s part in this rise, with special attention to the ways in which the principles and practices of democracy and capitalism have shaped American foreign policy. Topics will include the nation’s acquisition of overseas territory and colonies, the influence of Wilsonianism and America’s entry into the world wars, and the Cold War.

Instructor: Eric Pullin (Carthage College)

Schedule: Thursdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 630 O2A: American Statesmen – George Washington and Alexander Hamilton (2) ** CLOSED **

This course will examine the critical relationship between George Washington and Alexander Hamilton.  Theirs was the indispensable alliance of the founding era – what makes this relationship all the more interesting is that these men came from two entirely different worlds, yet somehow they bonded to create a new nation, a nation that would eventually become a superpower. Washington’s and Hamilton’s collaboration was crucial to winning the American Revolution, adopting the Constitution, and creating the institutions necessary to secure liberty at home and respect abroad.

Instructor: Stephen F. Knott (United States Naval War College)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 660 O2B: The Civil Rights Era (2) ** CLOSED **

The Civil Rights Era has been variously called America’s Second Reconstruction and its third Great Awakening. The most admired leader of the period, Martin Luther King, Jr., hailed the movement itself as “America’s third revolution…the great mass-action crusade for freedom that has ever occurred in American history.” In this course we consider the Civil Rights movement’s history and philosophy in a broad overview, beginning with its 19th-century origins and extending through its late 20th-century aftermath. Through a critical examination of primary sources, we assess the movement’s triumphs, its shortcomings, and its enduring legacy. All along, we pay close attention to its relation to the American ideals, inscribed in the Declaration of Independence, that its leaders claimed as their inspiration and justification.

Instructor: Peter C. Myers (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire)

Schedule: Mondays and Wednesdays, 6:30 pm to 8:05 pm ET

Course Materials: 

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