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Spring 2019 Schedule

Registration begins November 1st.

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Spring 2019 Session 1 (Online)

January 7 to March 3

AHG 501 O1A: The American Revolution (2)

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: Scott E. Yenor (Boise State University)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 502 O1A: The American Founding (2)

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: Christopher Burkett (Ashland University)

Schedule: Mondays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus

AHG 503 O1A: Sectionalism and Civil War (2)

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Dan Monroe (Millikin University)

Schedule: Mondays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus

AHG 505 O1A: The Progressive Era (2)

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: William Atto (University of Dallas)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus

AHG 506 O1A: The Rise of Modern America, 1914-1945 (2)

With the exception of the Civil War era, it is difficult to find another thirty-year period in U.S. history during which the nation underwent such dramatic change. In 1914 the United States was no more than a regional power, with a primarily rural demography and a relatively unobtrusive federal government. Thanks to the experience of two world wars, a major cultural conflict (the 1920s), and a disastrous economic crisis the country was transformed into the global economic and military power that it remains to this day. This course will examine the cultural, economic, military, and diplomatic events and trends of the period 1914-1945.

Instructor: Eric Pullin (Carthage College)

Schedule: Mondays & Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 7:50 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus

AHG 623 O1A: Gender and Equality in America (2)

This course explores the history of women in America from the early 19th century to the present, especially the political struggle to gain increased civil and political rights. Using primary source material from leading female intellectuals and activists, this course will consider the myriad ways that women have helped to shape the course of United States history.

Instructor: Sarah Morgan Smith (Ashbrook Center at Ashland University)

Schedule: Mondays and Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 9:50 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus

AHG 630 O1A: American Statesmen – Abraham Lincoln (2)

Abraham Lincoln wove his words into the fabric of American history. In the twenty-first century, Lincoln’s political language remains more contemporary than all but the most timeless of the political language of the American Founding. This course is a study of selected Lincoln speeches aiming to illuminate Lincoln’s understanding of the relation of the principles of the American Founding to the most pressing issues of his day.

Instructor: Joseph Fornieri (Rochester Institute of Technology)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus

AHG 631 O1A: American Political Rhetoric (2)

This course examines American political rhetoric in its broadest sense as the art of political persuasion and civic education. Surveying the field from the Founders through Barack Obama, we will engage in a careful reading of the speeches and writings of leading statesmen, including Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, FDR, JFK, Ronald Reagan, and Barack Obama. We will attempt to understand how their rhetorical techniques contributed to their respective successes.

Instructor: Ken Masugi (Johns Hopkins University)

Schedule: Thursdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus

AHG 641 O1A: The Supreme Court (2)

This course is an intensive study of the highest court in the federal judiciary, focusing on the place of the Supreme Court in the American constitutional order. Areas of study may include the relationship between the Court and the other branches of the federal government as well as the states; the Court’s power of judicial review; and judicial politics and statesmanship. We will examine these kinds of issues by investigating how the Court has interpreted the Constitution in some of its most historic decisions.

Instructor: Eric C. Sands (Berry College)

Schedule: Thursdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus

AHG 660 O1A: World War II (2)

World War II was the most destructive conflict in the history of the world, affecting nearly everyone who was alive at the time, as well as the generations that followed. This seminar will examine the causes, course, and consequences of the war, both in the European and Asian/Pacific theaters, as well as on the American homefront. While it will emphasize the role that the United States played in the conflict, it will not ignore those aspects of the war in which Americans were not directly involved, such as the early war years (1939-41), and the genocidal conflict between Germany and the Soviet Union.

Instructor: John Moser (Ashland University)

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course Materials: Syllabus

Spring 2019 Session 2 (Online)

March 4 to April 27

AHG 501 O2B: The American Revolution (2)

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: Robert M.S. McDonald (United States Military Academy)

Schedule: Thursdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 502 O2B: The American Founding (2)

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: J. David Alvis (Wofford College)

Schedule: Mondays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 503 O2B: Sectionalism and Civil War (2)

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Dennis K. Boman (Lindenwood University)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 505 O2B: The Progressive Era (2)

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: Jason Jividen (Saint Vincent College)

Schedule: Mondays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 506 O2B: The Rise of Modern America, 1914-1945 (2)

With the exception of the Civil War era, it is difficult to find another thirty-year period in U.S. history during which the nation underwent such dramatic change. In 1914 the United States was no more than a regional power, with a primarily rural demography and a relatively unobtrusive federal government. Thanks to the experience of two world wars, a major cultural conflict (the 1920s), and a disastrous economic crisis the country was transformed into the global economic and military power that it remains to this day. This course will examine the cultural, economic, military, and diplomatic events and trends of the period 1914-1945.

Instructor: David F. Krugler (University of Wisconsin-Platteville)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 510 O2A: Great American Texts: The Education of Henry Adams (2)

Henry Adams (1838-1918) was an historian, a professor, and a member of one of America’s leading families. In this course, we will read his autobiographical work, The Education of Henry Adams, considered by some scholars of intellectual history to be the best such work ever written by an American. As Adams’ life nearly connects the founding generation to the beginning of the 20th Century, when the United States begins to emerge as a world power, his autobiography offers penetrating analysis of the transformation of the US from a small, chiefly agrarian society to a large, modern, industrial society. In addition to analysis of key political and historical events, Adams reflects on the role of science and technology in the modern world as well on the diminished status of religious practice in modern life. Perhaps most troubling, Adams alleges that liberal education inadequately prepares the young to face the challenges of the modern world. We turn to Henry Adams’ Education, then, for the sake of our own.

Instructor: Gregory A. McBrayer (Ashland University)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 510 O2B: Great American Texts: The Literature of the Vietnam War (2)

The Vietnam War was once thought to be emblematic of the social, political, and cultural problems of the United States in the 1960s. One of the biggest challenges when studying any era is to understand the problems of that era as the people of the day understood them. The material in this course examines the deeper lessons of the Vietnam War in its historical context and through the two most notable literary treatments of the war published in the 1950s. By studying what perceptive fiction writers believed before the 1960s and the conclusions of historians after the war concluded we may begin to learn the limitations of contemporary assessments of any notable event.

Instructor: Stephen K. Tootle (College of the Sequoias)

Schedule: Thursdays, 4:45 pm to 8:00 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 605 O2A: The Age of Enterprise (2)

In the last decades of the 19th Century, the United States took decisive steps away from its rural, agrarian past toward its industrial future, assuming its place among world powers. This course examines that movement, covering such topics as business-labor relations, political corruption, immigration, imperialism, the New South, and segregation and racism.

Instructor: Gregory L. Schneider (Emporia State University)

Schedule: Mondays and Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 7:50 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 610 O2A: American Foreign Policy (2)

This course examine events and issues in the foreign policy of the American republic. Topics include the major schools of thought and approaches, the connection between domestic and foreign politics, and the connection between the principles of the American regime and its foreign policy.

Instructor: Jason W. Stevens (Ashland University)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 633 O2A: The American Presidency II – Johnson to the present (2)

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from Reconstruction to the present. It focuses on how changing conceptions of the presidency have shaped American political life in the 19th and 20th centuries, especially as America has become a global power.

Instructor: Stephen F. Knott (United States Naval War College)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 660 O2C: The Fourth Amendment (2)

This course is an intensive study of the history, politics, and law of the Fourth Amendment. What is an unreasonable search or seizure? When must government get a warrant? Does technology change any of the answers to those questions? To address these issues, we will look at the text and constitutional principles of the Fourth Amendment as well as its historical development, especially through Supreme Court decisions.

Instructor: Jeffrey Sikkenga (Ashland University)

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course Materials:

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