Summer 2013 Live Online Courses

Schedule of Courses

  Previous Courses | Request More Info

Session 1 (June 10 to June 20)

Great American Texts: Mark Twain

One way citizens of large republics are educated in the principles of government is through novels. With this in mind, this course examines selections from the work of Mark Twain. Not only is Twain America’s most enduringly popular author, but his novels depict important aspects of the American character and have much to say about such themes as equality, slavery, freedom, modern science, Christianity, and democratic leadership, all of which are crucial for understanding American history and politics.

Instructor: David Foster (Ashland University)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm Eastern

Great American Texts: Democracy in America

Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America is commonly regarded as the most profound study of America ever written. Seeing “in America more than America,” Tocqueville studies America to understand the nature of modern democracy itself. In the course of his discussion, he examines, among many other subjects, America’s democratic social condition, its constitutional federalism, the problem of majority tyranny in America, the troubled relations among its racial groups, the prevailing understanding of sexual equality, the relation of religion and government, the powerful love of material well-being, and the dangers of administrative centralization and “mild despotism.” This course will examine Tocqueville’s treatments of these and other subjects in extensive excerpts from his book, all with a larger view toward understanding his descriptive account of democracy in America, his analysis of the main dangers it faces, and his suggestions as to the proper remedies for those dangers-the means for preserving and enhancing liberty in a nation dedicated to the principle of political and social equality.

Instructor: Ken Masugi (Johns Hopkins University)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm Eastern

Session 2 (June 24 to July 3)

Sectionalism and Civil War

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Mackubin Owens (United States Naval War College)

Schedule: Monday, June 24 through Friday, June 28, and Monday, July 1 through Wednesday, July 3, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm Eastern

The Progressive Era

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: J. David Alvis (Wofford College)

Schedule: Monday, June 24 through Friday, June 28, and Monday, July 1 through Wednesday, July 3, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm Eastern

Session 3 (July 8 to July 18)

Civil War and Reconstruction

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructor: Stephen Tootle (College of the Sequoias)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm Eastern

The Supreme Court

This course is an intensive study of the highest court in the federal judiciary, focusing on the place of the Supreme Court in the American constitutional order. Areas of study may include the relationship between the Court and the other branches of the federal government as well as the states; the Court’s power of judicial review; and judicial politics and statesmanship. We will examine these kinds of issues by investigating how the Court has interpreted the Constitution in some of its most historic decisions.

Instructor: Eric Sands (Berry College)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm

Session 4 (July 22 to August 1)

The American Founding

This course is an intensive study of the Constitutional Convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of The Federalist and the anti-federalist papers.

Instructor: Melanie Marlowe (Miami University)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 5:15 pm to 8:30 pm

The American Revolution

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: Scott Yenor (Boise State University)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm Eastern

Get Email Updates

TeachingAmericanHistory.org is a project of the Ashbrook Center at Ashland University

401 College Avenue | Ashland, Ohio 44805 (419) 289-5411 | (877) 289-5411 (Toll Free)

info@TeachingAmericanHistory.org