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Summer 2015 (On-Campus Courses)

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Summer 2015 Session 1 (On-Campus)

June 21 to June 26

AHG 501 1C: The American Revolution (2) **CLOSED**

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: Robert M.S. McDonald (United States Military Academy)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 502 1A: The American Founding (2) **CLOSED**

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: Christopher Burkett (Ashland University)

Guest Lecturer: Gordon Lloyd (Pepperdine University)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 510 1A: Great American Texts – The Federalist (2) **CLOSED**

The Federalist is a complex political work comprised of arguments about war, economics, national unity, and liberty (among other things) based on appeals to human nature, history, reason, and prudence. In this course we will examine and discuss The Federalist as fully and as deeply we can, aiming to understand how (or whether) its parts fit together in a coherent whole and its enduring contribution to our understanding of politics.

Instructor: David Foster (Ashland University)

Course Materials: Syllabus  There is no Course Packet for this class.

AHG 632 1A: The American Presidency I – Washington to Lincoln (2) **CLOSED**

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from the Founding era through the Civil War. It focuses on how the presidency shaped American political life as the country grew and struggled with rising sectional tensions.

Instructors: Jeremy Bailey (University of Houston) and Marc K. Landy (Boston College)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet (forthcoming)

AHG 660 1A: The Fourth Amendment (2) **CLOSED**

This course is an intensive study of the history, politics, and law of the Fourth Amendment. What is an unreasonable search or seizure? When must government get a warrant? Does technology change any of the answers to those questions? To address these issues, we will look at the text and constitutional principles of the Fourth Amendment as well as its historical development, especially through Supreme Court decisions.

Instructor: Jeffrey Sikkenga (Ashland University)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Summer 2015 Session 2 (On-Campus)

June 28 to July 3

AHG 501 2A: The American Revolution (2)

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: Jeremy Bailey (University of Houston)

Course Materials: Syllabus (Revised 5/29/15)  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

AHG 502 2C: The American Founding (2)

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: Christopher Burkett (Ashland University)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 622 2A: Religion in American History and Politics (2) **CLOSED**

From the time that the first Europeans arrived in America, religion has been an important part of American life. This course examines the various ways in which religion has played a role in American history, with particular emphasis on the role of religion in American politics.

Instructors: David Tucker (Ashbrook Center at Ashland University) and Sarah Morgan Smith (Rutgers University)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

AHG 660 2B: The Ratification Debate (2)

This course examines the debate over ratification of the U.S. Constitution in 1787-1788. Once the Philadelphia convention adjourned on September 17 and forwarded the finished Constitution to the states, an intense national debate, lasting more than a year, got underway. This class will focus on the debates engendered by the new Constitution, examine the arguments developed for and against the document by its advocates and critics, trace the patterns and the process of ratification, and consider the historical, theoretical, and philosophical backgrounds to those debates. Finally, the course will examine the ratification contests as they took place both in the newspapers and in the individual state ratifying conventions.

Instructors: Todd Estes (Oakland University) and Natalie Taylor (Skidmore College)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 660 2C: National Security and the Constitution (2)  **CLOSED**

How has the United States reached the point where the presidency seems to have almost carte blanche authority over national security affairs? This course will examine the powers granted by the Constitution in the national security arena. Topics of study will include the debates in the Constitutional Convention over the war power and the conflict between the Federalists and the Jeffersonians over the interpretation of this power and other security related powers. We will go on to examine the unilateral use of force by early American presidents, including their use of covert operations. Prominent court cases involving war powers and internal security measures will also be examined, especially those growing out of the Civil War and the two world wars. The course will conclude with an examination of the rise of the Central Intelligence Agency and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and include a review of contemporary topics such as the War Powers Act, congressional oversight of the intelligence agencies, and the legality of various government actions during the War on Terror. This course will shed light on the evolution of the so-called “American national security state,” using the language of the Constitution and the principles and practices of the framers as a benchmark to assess the legitimacy of this “state.”

Instructor: Stephen Knott (U.S. Naval War College)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Summer 2015 Session 3 (On-Campus)

July 5 to July 10

AHG 504 3A: Civil War and Reconstruction (2) **CLOSED**

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war Amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructor: Lucas Morel (Washington & Lee University) and Jonathan White (Christopher Newport University)

Course Materials: Syllabus (Updated 6/18/15)  Course Packet (Updated 6/18/15)  Supplemental Course Packet

AHG 510 3B: Great American Texts – Benjamin Franklin & Mark Twain (2)

From the moment of the Revolution, Americans and observers in the Old World believed that Americans were doing something unprecedented. This led some to ask in bewilderment and others in expectation, “What then is the American, this new man?” This course considers two classic explorations of this question, Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography and Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

Instructors: Christopher Flannery (Azusa Pacific University) and Peter W. Schramm (Ashland University)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet  Supplemental Course Packet

AHG 607 3A: America During the Cold War (2) **CLOSED**

The simmering conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union from 1945 to 1989 was the defining phenomenon of the age, affecting not only the country’s foreign policy but its politics, society, economy, and culture as well. In this course students will examine the most important events, ideas, and personalities of the 44 years from the end of World War II to the end of the Reagan administration.

Instructor: John Moser (Ashland University) and Eric Pullin (Carthage College)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 660 3D: 20th Century American Political Economy (2)

This course examines the nature of a market economy, with emphasis on its relation to individual liberties and the political system of the United States. The course also reviews the challenges to a market system, including regulation, fairness in competition, central planning, and redistributionism.

Instructor: Peter McNamara (Utah State University)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

Summer 2015 Session 4 (On-Campus)

July 12 to July 17

AHG 503 4A: Sectionalism and Civil War (2)

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Dan Monroe (Millikin University) and Dennis Boman

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 505 4A: The Progressive Era (2)

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: William Atto (University of Dallas)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 604 4A: The Early Republic (2) **CLOSED**

Having adopted a form of government, the Americans had to make it work. This course examines their efforts to do so, as the Republic took shape amidst foreign dangers, political conflict, westward expansion and religious revivals.

Instructor: Robert M.S. McDonald (United States Military Academy)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet

AHG 660 4E: Indian Assimilation, Resistance, and Removal (2) **CLOSED**

During the first decades of the nineteenth century, the tribes of what is today the southeastern United States took steps toward assimilation and accommodation of American culture, becoming known as the Five Civilized Tribes. During the same period, pressure mounted on them to remove to the trans-Mississippi West. Events culminated in the 1830s with open conflict and the forced removal often called “The Trail of Tears.” Often these events are portrayed as inevitable and depicted in simplistic terms. This class will help students understand the complexities and nuances of a pivotal time in American history.

Instructors: Jace Weaver (University of Georgia) and Jeremy Bailey (University of Houston)

Course Materials: Syllabus  Course Packet  Game Book

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