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Summer 2017 Schedule (Online)

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Four Week Courses

Four Week Online – Session 1 – May 22 to June 15

AHG 503 O1B: Sectionalism and Civil War (2)

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Dennis K. Boman (Lindenwood University)

Schedule: Monday and Thursday, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

 

Two Week Courses

Two Week Online – Session 1 – June 5 to June 15

AHG 502 O1B: The American Founding (2)

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: Scott E. Yenor (Boise State University)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 510 O1D: Great American Texts–Democracy in America (2)

Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America is commonly regarded as the most profound study of America ever written. Seeing “in America more than America,” Tocqueville studies America to understand the nature of modern democracy itself. In the course of his discussion, he examines, among many other subjects, America’s democratic social condition, its constitutional federalism, the problem of majority tyranny in America, the troubled relations among its racial groups, the prevailing understanding of sexual equality, the relation of religion and government, the powerful love of material well-being, and the dangers of administrative centralization and “mild despotism.” This course will examine Tocqueville’s treatments of these and other subjects in extensive excerpts from his book, all with a larger view toward understanding his descriptive account of democracy in America, his analysis of the main dangers it faces, and his suggestions as to the proper remedies for those dangers-the means for preserving and enhancing liberty in a nation dedicated to the principle of political and social equality.

Instructor: David Foster (Ashland University)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 7:15 pm to 10:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 633 O1A: The American Presidency II–Johnson to the present (2)  ** CLOSED **

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from Reconstruction to the present. It focuses on how changing conceptions of the presidency have shaped American political life in the 19th and 20th centuries, especially as America has become a global power.

Instructor: J. David Alvis (Wofford College)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

Two Week Online – Session 2 – June 19 to June 29

AHG 606 O2A: America between World Wars (2)

In the 1920s, changes in America that had been underway for several decades came fully into view. This is the period when cultural wars first appeared (e.g., The Scopes Trial) and the transformative effects of industrial capitalism touched every part of American life. In the 1930s, an economic crisis challenged received views of the proper relationship of the government to the economy. The course examines various political and economic changes that occurred in this period, with a special emphasis on the New Deal.

Instructor: Gregory Schneider (Emporia State University)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday,6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 608 O2A: Civil War and Reconstruction (2)

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war Amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructor: Eric C. Sands (Berry College)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 7:15 pm to 10:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

Two Week Online – Session 3 – July 3 to July 13

AHG 501 O3B: The American Revolution (2)

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: Jason W. Stevens (Ashland University)

Schedule: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday (Week 1), and Monday through Thursday (Week 2), 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 505 O3B: The Progressive Era (2)

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: Jason Jividen (Saint Vincent College)

Schedule: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday (Week 1), and Monday through Thursday (Week 2), 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

Two Week Online – Session 4 – July 17 to July 27

AHG 621 O4A: Race and Equality in America (2)

This course explores the history of black Americans as they strove to secure their dignity as human beings, and rights as American citizens, in the face of racial prejudice. Students will examine the writings of leading black intellectuals and activists about human equality, slavery, self-government, the rule of law, emancipation, colonization, and citizenship. The course will also review laws, constitutional amendments, court cases, and social criticism addressing civil and political rights in America.

Instructor: Emily S. Hess (Ashland University)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 660 O4F: The Vietnam War (2)

This course examines the origins, progress, and outcome of the Vietnam War from 1945 through 1975. This class is taught primarily through the close examination of documents with an emphasis on the changes that took place in American culture – politically, socially, intellectually, and militarily – as a result.

Instructor: William Atto (University of Dallas)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

Two Week Online – Session 5 – July 31 to August 10

AHG 510 O5E: Great American Texts—Toni Morrison

The novels of Nobel Prize laureate Toni Morrison are not just outstanding literary works, they are also profound meditations on the emotional, psychological, and social impact of historical events and forces. In this course we will read, interpret, and discuss some of Morrison’s most important novels, including Beloved, to enrich our understanding of historical topics such as slavery, race, and family relations.

Instructor: David F. Krugler (University of Wisconsin-Platteville)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 506 O5B: The Rise of Modern America, 1914-1945 (2)  **CLOSED**

With the exception of the Civil War era, it is difficult to find another thirty-year period in U.S. history during which the nation underwent such dramatic change. In 1914 the United States was no more than a regional power, with a primarily rural demography and a relatively unobtrusive federal government. Thanks to the experience of two world wars, a major cultural conflict (the 1920s), and a disastrous economic crisis the country was transformed into the global economic and military power that it remains to this day. This course will examine the cultural, economic, military, and diplomatic events and trends of the period 1914-1945.

Instructor: Eric Pullin (Carthage College)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

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