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Summer 2018 (Online)

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Four Week Courses

Four Week Online – Session 1 – May 7 to June 1

AHG 510 O1C: Great American Texts-Mark Twain (2) ** CLOSED **

One way citizens of large republics are educated in the principles of government is through novels. With this in mind, this course examines selections from the work of Mark Twain. Not only is Twain America’s most enduringly popular author, but his novels depict important aspects of the American character and have much to say about such themes as equality, slavery, freedom, modern science, Christianity, and democratic leadership, all of which are crucial for understanding American history and politics. Our main texts will be Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court; if time permits, we will also consider The Adventures of Tom Sawyer or The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson.

Instructor: David Foster (Ashland University)

Schedule: Monday and Wednesday, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

Four Week Online – Session 2 – June 4 to June 30

AHG 604 O2A: The Early Republic (2) ** CLOSED **

Having adopted a form of government, the Americans had to make it work. This course examines their efforts to do so, as the Republic took shape amidst foreign dangers, political conflict, westward expansion and religious revivals.

Instructor: Todd Estes (Oakland University)

Schedule: Monday and Wednesday, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

Two Week Courses

Two Week Online – Session 3 – June 4 to June 15

AHG 502 O3C: The American Founding (2)

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: Scott E. Yenor (Boise State University)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

Two Week Online – Session 4 – June 18 to June 29

AHG 660 O4F: Free Speech in War, Hate, and on Campus (2)

This course explores the crucial role of free speech in a democratic republic and its utmost boundaries as tried by the circumstances of war and hateful expression in society and on campus. The First Amendment has been aptly described by Justice Cardozo as the “matrix, the indispensable condition of every other form of freedom.” Although it now enjoys a preferred place in our constitutional scheme, it has never been considered absolute. As Justice Holmes famously stated, one does not have the right “to shout fire in a crowded theatre.” The Supreme Court has balanced free speech against the competing constitutional values of national security, state police powers, privacy, due process and equal protection. Where then does one draw the line between protected and unprotected speech? Is hate speech entitled to protection under the Constitution? Can it be defined? What are the boundaries of free expression? With these questions in mind, we will analyze the Supreme Court’s evolving jurisprudence in landmark free speech cases.

Instructor: Joseph R. Fornieri (Rochester Institute of Technology)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

Two Week Online – Session 5 – July 2 to July 13

AHG 503 O5B: Sectionalism and Civil War (2)

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Joseph R. Fornieri (Rochester Institute of Technology)

Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday (Week 1), and Monday through Thursday (Week 2), 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 510 O5D: Great American Texts–The Federalist (2)

The Federalist is a complex political work comprised of arguments about war, economics, national unity, and liberty (among other things) based on appeals to human nature, history, reason, and prudence. In this course we will examine and discuss The Federalist as fully and as deeply we can, aiming to understand how (or whether) its parts fit together in a coherent whole and its enduring contribution to our understanding of politics.

Instructor: James R. Stoner, Jr. (Louisiana State University)

Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday (Week 1), and Monday through Thursday (Week 2), 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

Two Week Online – Session 6 – July 16 to July 27

AHG 501 O6B: The American Revolution (2)

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: S. Adam Seagrave (University of Missouri)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 610 O6A: American Foreign Policy (2)

This course examines the international relations of the United States from the Founding to today. Students will examine the history and development of American foreign policy, with special attention to the ways in which the principles and practices of constitutional, democratic-republicanism have shaped American foreign relations. Topics will include the tensions with European powers in the early republic, war with the Barbary Kingdoms, the Spanish-American War and Progressive Imperialism, the influence of Wilsonianism and America’s entry into WWI, Cold War strategies, and the new challenges of the post-9/11 era..

Instructor: Christopher Burkett (Ashland University)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

Two Week Online – Session 7 – July 30 to August 10

AHG 608 O7A: Civil War and Reconstruction (2) ** CLOSED **

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war Amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructor: Eric C. Pullin (Carthage College)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 505 O7B: The Progressive Era (2)

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: William Atto (University of Dallas)

Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

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