2007 Summer Institutes

Session One: Sunday, June 24, 2007 to Friday, June 29, 2007

AHG 504: Civil War and Reconstruction (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war Amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructors:

Mackubin T. Owens (U.S. Naval War College)

Paul Moreno (Hillsdale College)

AHG 604: Early Republic (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

Having adopted a form of government, the Americans had to make it work. This course examines their efforts to do so, as the Republic took shape amidst foreign dangers, political conflict, westward expansion and religious revivals.

Instructors:

Stephen Knott (University of Virginia)

Robert M.S. McDonald (U.S. Military Academy)

AHG 621: Race and Equality in America (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

This course explores the history of black Americans as they strove to secure their dignity as human beings, and rights as American citizens, in the face of racial prejudice. Students will examine the writings of leading black intellectuals and activists about human equality, slavery, self-government, the rule of law, emancipation, colonization, and citizenship. The course will also review laws, constitutional amendments, court cases, and social criticism addressing civil and political rights in America.

Instructors:

Lucas E. Morel (Washington and Lee University)

Diana J. Schaub (Loyola University in Maryland)


Session Two: Sunday, July 1, 2007 to Friday, July 6, 2007

AHG 502A: The American Founding (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the anti-federalist papers.

Instructors:

Gordon Lloyd (Pepperdine University)

Christopher Burkett (Ashland University)

AHG 503A: Sectionalism and Civil War (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructors:

Mackubin T. Owens (U.S. Naval War College)

Thomas L. Krannawitter (Hillsdale College)

AHG 622: Religion in American History and Politics (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

From the time that the first Europeans arrived in America, religion has been an important part of American life. This course examines the various ways in which religion has played a role in American history, with particular emphasis on the role of religion in American politics.

Instructors:

David Tucker (U.S. Naval Postgraduate School)

Paul O. Carrese (U.S. Air Force Academy)


Session Three: Sunday, July 8, 2007 to Friday, July 13, 2007

AHG 505: The Progressive Era (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructors:

Ronald J. Pestritto (Hillsdale College)

William J. Atto (University of Dallas)

AHG 607: America during the Cold War (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

The simmering conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union from 1945 to 1989 was the defining phenomenon of the age, affecting not only the country’s foreign policy but its politics, society, economy, and culture as well. In this course students will examine the most important events, ideas, and personalities of the 44 years from the end of World War II to the end of the Reagan administration.

Instructors:

John Moser (Ashland University)

David Krugler (University of Wisconsin-Platteville)

AHG 510A: Great American Texts: Mark Twain (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

One way citizens of large republics are educated in the principles of government is through novels. With this in mind, this course examines selections from the work of Mark Twain. Not only is Twain America’s most enduringly popular author, but his novels depict important aspects of the American character and have much to say about such themes as equality, slavery, freedom, modern science, Christianity, and democratic leadership, all of which are crucial for understanding American history and politics. Our main texts will be Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court; if time permits, we will also consider The Adventures of Tom Sawyer or The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson.

Instructor:

David Foster (Ashland University)

AHG 510C: Great American Texts: Ralph Ellison (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952) is the great American novel about race, perhaps even the great American novel. It considers and affirms the principle—that “mysterious binding force”—that holds us together as a people and that is tied to our own history. In doing so it raises all the important political questions about equality, freedom, rights and justice; the legacy of slavery and white supremacy, our “human and absurd diversity.” The novel’s deliberate attempt, in Ellison’s words, “to return to the mood of personal moral responsibility for democracy” makes perfectly clear the connection between literature and politics. The seminar will also consider a few of Ellison’s essays bearing directly on Invisible Man.

Instructor:

Peter W. Schramm (Ashland University)


Session Four: Sunday, July 22, 2007 to Friday, July 27, 2007

AHG 510B: Great American Texts: Notes of Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787 (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

From May 25 to September 17, 1787, delegates from twelve of the thirteen independent United States of America met in the State House in Philadelphia deliberating in secret about “the situation of the United States” and considering what measures might be necessary to “render the Constitution of the federal government adequate to the exigencies of the Union.” The result of their deliberations was the Constitution of the United States that remains the supreme law of the land to this day. James Madison’s “Notes” are by far the best record we have of these deliberations. They are one of the most authoritative records we have of the intentions of the framers of the Constitution when they were drafting that document. In this course we will study these “Notes” as thoroughly as we can, aiming at a fuller understanding of the Constitution and the founding statesmanship that produced it.

Instructor:

Christopher Flannery (Azusa Pacific University)

AHG 640: The Congress (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

This course focuses on the legislative branch of the U.S. government. It examines topics such as the constitutional powers of Congress, the relations between Congress and the other branches of the federal government and the states, and the changing structure and internal politics of Congress.

Instructors:

Andrew E. Busch (Claremont McKenna College)

Tiffany J. Miller (University of Dallas)

AHG 642: Political Parties (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

This course examines the development of American political parties, focusing on the meaning of parties and historic moments in the rise and fall of political parties from the Founding era to the present. Topics may include re-aligning elections, changing coalitions within American parties, and the contemporary Democratic and Republican parties.

Instructors:

Sidney Milkis (University of Virginia)

Marc K. Landy (Boston College)

AHG 660: Topics in American History and Government: America between 1898 and 1945 (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

This course will investigate the rise of America as a global power and the domestic transformations that underlay this process during the period from the Spanish-American War through the end of the Second World War. We will focus on politics, society, economics, diplomacy, and military affairs. The course will concentrate on American history, but it will also examine the international context for national development. We will read a combination of primary and secondary sources on the period.

Instructors:

Jeremi Suri (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Jean Edward Smith (Marshall University)


Session Five: Sunday, July 29, 2007 to Friday, August 3, 2007

AHG 501: The American Revolution (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the articles of confederation.

Instructors:

Jeffrey Sikkenga (Ashland University)

David A. Raney (Hillsdale College)

AHG 502B: The American Founding (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the anti-federalist papers.

Instructors:

Christopher Flannery (Azusa Pacific University)

Melanie Marlowe (Miami University)

AHG 503B: Sectionalism and Civil War (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructors:

Thomas L. Krannawitter (Hillsdale College)

Dan Monroe (Millikin University)

AHG 632: American Presidency I: Washington to Lincoln (Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from the Founding era through the Civil War. It focuses on how the presidency shaped American political life as the country grew and struggled with rising sectional tensions.

Instructors:

Marc K. Landy (Boston College)

Jeremy D. Bailey (Duquesne University)

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