2008 Summer Institutes

Session One: Sunday, June 22, 2008 to Friday, June 27, 2008

AHG 501A: The American Revolution (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Core

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the articles of confederation.

Instructors:

Mickey Craig (Hillsdale College)

Robert M.S. McDonald (U.S. Military Academy)

AHG 502A: The American Founding (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Core

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructors:

Gordon Lloyd (Pepperdine University)

Christopher Burkett (Ashland University)

AHG 510A: Great American Texts: Democracy in America (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Core

Alexis de Tocquevilles Democracy in America is the best study of America to be written by a foreigner. It examines government, religion, the races, private associations, literature, the family, and much else, all the while contrasting democratic America with old aristocratic Europe. This course will examine as much of the book as we can, focusing especially on Tocquevilles account of the love of equality (and its dangers) and his prescriptions for the preservation of liberty.

Instructor:

David Foster (Ashland University)

AHG 611: The American Way of War (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Elective

This course examines how Americans have used military force, focusing on the relationship between civilian and military leaders, characteristic strategic approaches, and the connection between our political principles and our military practices.

Instructors:

Mackubin T. Owens (U.S. Naval War College)

Brian Linn (Texas A & M University)

AHG 621: Race and Equality in America (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Elective

This course will explore the history of black Americans as they strove to secure their dignity as human beings, and rights as American citizens, in the face of racial prejudice. It will examine the diverse viewpoints of leading black intellectuals and activists on human equality, slavery, self-government, the rule of law, emancipation, colonization, and citizenship. Contemporary issues to be considered may include affirmative action, black reparations, racial profiling, and the “achievement gap” in education.

Instructors:

Lucas E. Morel (Washington and Lee University)

Robert Norrell (University of Tennessee)


Session Two: Sunday, June 29, 2008 to Friday, July 4, 2008

AHG 503A: Sectionalism and Civil War (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Core

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructors:

Thomas L. Krannawitter (Hillsdale College)

Dan Monroe (Millikin University)

AHG 504A: Civil War and Reconstruction (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Core

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war Amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructors:

Mackubin T. Owens (U.S. Naval War College)

Lucas Morel (Washington and Lee University)

AHG 505A: The Progressive Era (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Core

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructors:

Gordon Lloyd (Pepperdine University)

John Moser (Ashland University)

AHG 510B: Great American Texts: The Federalist Papers (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Core

The Federalist is a complex political work comprised of arguments about war, economics, national unity, and liberty (among other things) based on appeals to human nature, history, reason, and prudence. In this course we will examine and discuss the Federalist as fully and as deeply we can, aiming to understand how (or whether) its parts fit together in a coherent whole and its enduring contribution to our understanding of politics.

Instructor:

David Foster (Ashland University)

AHG 630A: American Statesmen: FDR and Lincoln (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Elective

Even though the powers of the American Executive are controlled and limited, extraordinary acts of statesmanship are possible. This seminar examines two presidents who demonstrated extraordinary political leadership. We will examine these statesmen and the political circumstances in which their prudence revealed itself. With the permission of the Associate Director, this course may be taken more than once.

Instructors:

Peter W. Schramm (Ashland University)

Jean Edward Smith (Marshall University)

AHG 633: American Presidency II: Johnson to the Present (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Elective

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from Reconstruction to the present. It focuses on how changing conceptions of the presidency have shaped American political life in the 19th and 20th centuries, especially as America has become a global power.

Instructors:

Marc K. Landy (Boston College)

Jeremy D. Bailey (University of Houston)


Session Three: Sunday, July 6, 2008 to Friday, July 11, 2008

AHG 603: Colonial Era (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Elective

This course focuses on the development of an indigenous political culture in the British colonies. It pays special attention to the development of representative political institutions and how these emerged through the confrontation between colonists and King and proprietors.

Instructors:

David Tucker (U.S. Naval Postgraduate School)

Todd Estes (Oakland University)

AHG 605: The Age of Enterprise (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Elective

In the last decades of the 19th Century, the United States took decisive steps away from its rural, agrarian past toward its industrial future, assuming its place among world powers. This course examines that movement, covering such topics as business-labor relations, political corruption, immigration, imperialism, the New South, and segregation and racism.

Instructors:

David Beito (University of Alabama)

<!––>Mark Brady

AHG 660: Topics in American History and Government – World War II (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Elective

World War II was the most destructive conflict in the history of the world, affecting nearly everyone who was alive at the time, as well as the generations that followed. This seminar will examine the causes, course, and consequences of the war, both in the European and Asian/Pacific theaters as well as on the American homefront. While it will emphasize the role that the United States played in the conflict, it will not ignore those aspects of the war in which Americans were not directly involved, such as the early war years (1939-41), and the genocidal conflict between Germany and the Soviet Union.

Instructors:

John Moser (Ashland University)

David Krugler (University of Wisconsin-Platteville)


Session Four: Sunday, July 20, 2008 to Friday, July 25, 2008

AHG 501B: The American Revolution (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Core

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the articles of confederation.

Instructors:

Christopher Burkett (Ashland University)

Natalie Taylor (Skidmore College)

AHG 504B: Civil War and Reconstruction (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Core

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war Amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructors:

David Raney (Hillsdale College)

Matthew Norman (Gettysburg College)

AHG 505B: The Progressive Era (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Core

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructors:

Ronald J. Pestritto (Hillsdale College)

William Atto (University of Dallas)

AHG 510C: Great American Texts: Notes of Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787 (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Core

James Madison’s “Notes” are by far the best record we have of the deliberations in the Constitutional Convention. They are one of the most authoritative records we have of the intentions of the framers of the Constitution when they were drafting that document. In this course we will study these “Notes” as thoroughly as we can, aiming at a fuller understanding of the Constitution and the founding statesmanship that produced it.

Instructor:

Christopher Flannery (Azusa Pacific University)

AHG 630B: American Statesmen: Madison and Wilson (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Elective

This course examines the lives, character, political thought and political practice of two of America’s leading thinkers and statesmen, viz., James Madison and Woodrow Wilson. Close attention will be given to the relationship between ideas and actions in their political careers.

Instructors:

John Marini (University of Nevada-Reno)

Colleen Sheehan (Villanova University)


Session Five: Sunday, July 27, 2008 to Friday, August 1, 2008

AHG 502B: The American Founding (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Core

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructors:

Christopher Flannery (Azusa Pacific University)

Melanie Marlowe (Miami University)

AHG 503B: Sectionalism and Civil War (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Core

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructors:

Thomas L. Krannawitter (Hillsdale College)

Dan Monroe (Millikin University)

AHG 510D: Great American Texts: Franklins Autobiography and Jeffersons Notes on the State of Virginia (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Core

Franklins Autobiography and Jeffersons Notes on the State of Virginia are exemplary expressions of the principles that inform the American way of life. The course aims to recover what such a claim means by paying careful attention to what the books say about nature, human desires, reason, education, religion, government, farming, commerce, and several other things. As time permits, we will consider related writings of Franklin and Jefferson.

Instructor:

David Tucker (U.S. Naval Postgraduate School)

AHG 610: American Foreign Policy (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Elective

Students examine events and issues in the foreign policy of the American republic. Topics include the major schools of thought and approaches, the connection between domestic and foreign politics, and the connection between the principles of the American regime and its foreign policy. With the permission of the Associate Director, a student may take this course twice.

Instructors:

David Krugler (University of Wisconsin-Platteville)

Stephen Knott (U.S. Naval War College)

AHG 641: The Supreme Court (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Elective

This course is an intensive study of the highest court in the federal judiciary, focusing on the place of the Supreme Court in the American constitutional order. Areas of study may include the relationship between the Court and the other branches of the federal government as well as the states; the Court’s power of judicial review; and judicial politics and statesmanship. We will examine these kinds of issues by investigating how the Court has interpreted the Constitution in some of its most historic decisions.

Instructors:

Jeff Sikkenga (Ashland University)

Anthony Peacock (Utah State University)

AHG 642: Political Parties (Syllabus<!–; PDF Syllabus–>) — Elective

This course examines the development of American political parties, focusing on the meaning of parties and historic moments in the rise and fall of political parties from the Founding era to the present. Topics may include re-aligning elections, changing coalitions within American parties, and the contemporary Democratic and Republican parties.

Instructors:

Sidney Milkis (University of Virginia)

Marc K. Landy (Boston College)

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