2010 Summer Institutes

Session One: Sunday, June 20, 2010 to Friday, June 25, 2010

AHG 502A: The American Founding <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course is an intensive study of the Constitutional Convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of The Federalist and the anti-federalist papers.

Instructors:

Gordon Lloyd (Pepperdine University)

Christopher Burkett (Ashland University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 3.2 MB)

AHG 503A: Sectionalism and Civil War <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. This course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the Civil War, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructors:

Mackubin T. Owens (U.S. Naval War College)

Dan Monroe (Millikin University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 12.6 MB)

Supplemental Course Packet (PDF – .7 MB)

AHG 510A: Great American Texts: The Federalist <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

The Federalist is a complex political work comprised of arguments about war, economics, national unity, and liberty (among other things) based on appeals to human nature, history, reason, and prudence. In this course we will examine and discuss The Federalist as fully and as deeply we can, aiming to understand how (or whether) its parts fit together in a coherent whole and its enduring contribution to our understanding of politics.

Instructor:

David Foster (Ashland University)

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Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

There is no photocopied course packet for this course.

AHG 510B: Great American Texts: Abraham Lincoln <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

Abraham Lincoln wove his words into the fabric of American history. In the twenty-first century, Lincoln’s political language remains more contemporary than all but the most timeless of the political language of the American Founding. This course is a study of selected Lincoln speeches aiming to illuminate Lincoln’s understanding of the relation of the principles of the American Founding to the most pressing issues of his day.

Instructor:

Peter W. Schramm (Ashland University)

Course Materials:

SyllabusRevised 6/15/2010

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 0.4 MB) – Revised 6/15/2010

AHG 621: Race and Equality in America <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Elective ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course will explore the history of black Americans as they strove to secure their dignity as human beings, and rights as American citizens, in the face of racial prejudice. It will examine the diverse viewpoints of leading black intellectuals and activists on human equality, slavery, self-government, the rule of law, emancipation, colonization, and citizenship. Contemporary issues to be considered may include affirmative action, black reparations, racial profiling, and the “achievement gap” in education.

Instructors:

Lucas E. Morel (Washington and Lee University)

Peter C. Myers (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 25.8 MB)

Supplemental Course Packet (PDF – 22.1 MB)


Session Two: Sunday, June 27, 2010 to Friday, July 2, 2010

AHG 501A: The American Revolution <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructors:

Mickey Craig (Hillsdale College)

Robert M.S. McDonald (U.S. Military Academy)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 1.6 MB)

AHG 504A: Civil War and Reconstruction <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructors:

Mackubin T. Owens (U.S. Naval War College)

Lucas Morel (Washington and Lee University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus REVISED – 6/8/10

Syllabus (PDF) REVISED – 6/8/10

Course Packet (PDF – 29 MB) REVISED – 6/16/10

Supplemental Course Packet (PDF – 4.1 MB)

AHG 505A: The Progressive Era <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructors:

John Moser (Ashland University)

J. David Alvis (Wofford College)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 2.2 MB)

AHG 510C: Great American Texts: Frederick Douglass <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

To reflect on the life of Frederick Douglass is to be reminded of the famous self-description attributed to his great contemporary, Mark Twain: “I am not an American; I am the American.” A classic self-made man, Douglass, like his country, rose from a low beginning to a great height; he gained freedom by his own virtue and against great odds in a revolutionary struggle; and he matured into an internationally renowned apostle of universal liberty. In this course, we consider Douglass’ telling of his own story, taking as primary texts his three autobiographies: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845), My Bondage and My Freedom (1855), and Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (1881; 1892). We will find in these texts not only the annals of an unforgettable life but also Douglass’ reflections on enduring issues in American political thought such as the nature and specific evil of slavery, the nature and grounds of human rights and freedom, and the meaning and mission of the American Republic.

Instructor:

Peter C. Myers (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire)

Course Materials:

SyllabusRevised 6/15/2010

Syllabus (PDF)Revised 6/15/2010

Course Packet (PDF – 7.3 MB)

AHG 630A: American Statesmen: LBJ and Reagan <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Elective ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course examines the lives, character, political thought, and political practice of two of the twentieth century’s most notable presidents: Lyndon Baines Johnson and Ronald Reagan. The course will address both the domestic reform agenda each proposed, as well as the foreign policy challenges each faced. The sources and circumstances of the political and economic philosophies of each will be surveyed, along with an assessment of where each succeeded and failed to attain his objectives and areas where a full verdict is more difficult to reach.

Instructors:

Steven Hayward (American Enterprise Institute)

Gregory L. Schneider (Emporia State University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 44 MB)
<!–
  Supplemental Course Packet (PDF – 12.7 MB)–>

AHG 631: American Political Rhetoric <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Elective ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course examines American political rhetoric in its broadest sense as the art of political persuasion and civic education. Surveying the field from the Founders through Barack Obama, we will engage in a careful reading of the speeches and writings of leading statesmen and literati, including Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, FDR, JFK, Robert Frost, and Ronald Reagan.

Instructors:

Ken Masugi (Johns Hopkins University)

Colleen Sheehan (Villanova University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus REVISED – 5/21/10

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 3.8 MB)

Supplemental Course Packet (PDF – 3.1 MB)


Session Three: Sunday, July 4, 2010 to Friday, July 9, 2010

AHG 510D: Great American Texts: Mark Twain <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

One way citizens of large republics are educated in the principles of government is through novels. With this in mind, this course examines selections from the work of Mark Twain. Not only is Twain America’s most enduringly popular author, but his novels depict important aspects of the American character and have much to say about such themes as equality, slavery, freedom, modern science, Christianity, and democratic leadership, all of which are crucial for understanding American history and politics.

Instructor:

David Foster (Ashland University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 0.3 MB)

AHG 603: Colonial America <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Elective ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course focuses on the development of an indigenous political culture in the British colonies. It pays special attention to the development of representative political institutions and how these emerged through the confrontation between colonists and King and proprietors. The course also considers imperial politics through a study of the Albany Plan of Union.

Instructors:

Todd Estes (Oakland University)

Michael Schwarz (Ashland University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus REVISED 5/21/10

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 6.8 MB)
<!–
  Supplemental Course Packet (PDF – 0.2 MB)–>

AHG 610: American Foreign Policy – The Twentieth Century <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Elective ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course examines the international relations of the United States from the Spanish-American War to 9/11. The twentieth century marked the rise of the nation to a superpower with a myriad of global interests and commitments. Accordingly, students will examine foreign policy’s part in this rise, with special attention to the ways in which the principles and practices of democracy and capitalism have shaped American foreign policy. Topics will include the nation’s acquisition of overseas territory and colonies, the influence of Wilsonianism and America’s entry into the world wars, and the Cold War.

Instructors:

David Krugler (University of Wisconsin-Platteville)

Stephen Tootle (College of the Sequoias)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet A (PDF – 73.4 MB)

Course Packet B (PDF – 59.7 MB)

AHG 632: American Presidency I: Washington to Lincoln <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Elective ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from the Founding era through the Civil War. It focuses on how the presidency shaped American political life as the country grew and struggled with rising sectional tensions.

Instructors:

Stephen Knott (U.S. Naval War College)

Jeremy D. Bailey (University of Houston)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 1.3 MB)

AHG 660A: Topics in American History and Government – Postwar America, 1945-1968 <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Elective ***CLASS CLOSED***

Americans emerged from World War II more convinced than ever of the superiority of their society, their economic system, and their form of government. Most believed in a new consensus that accepted both a market economy and an expansive role for the federal government, upheld the traditional family, embraced a role for the nation as leader of the free world, and practically worshipped science and technology. The consensus would come under repeated attack from the left and the right, but ultimately held firm until the mid- to late-1960s. This course, examining the period from 1945 to 1968, will investigate both the “vital center” and its critics, and trace the rise and fall of the postwar consensus, as well as its implications for today’s politics and society.

Instructors:

John Moser (Ashland University)

Alan Petigny (University of Florida)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 57.7 MB)


Session Four: Sunday, July 11, 2010 to Friday, July 16, 2010

AHG 501B: The American Revolution <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructors:

Robert M.S. McDonald (U.S. Military Academy)

Richard A. Samuelson (California State University, San Bernardino)

Course Materials:

Syllabus REVISED – 5/21/10

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 4.5 MB)

AHG 502B: The American Founding <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course is an intensive study of the Constitutional Convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of The Federalist and the anti-federalist papers.

Instructors:

Mickey Craig (Hillsdale College)

Melanie Marlowe (Miami University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 2.4 MB)

AHG 504B: Civil War and Reconstruction <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructors:

Matthew Norman (Gettysburg College)

David A. Raney (Hillsdale College)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 11.5 MB)

Supplemental Course Packet (PDF – 19.1 MB)

AHG 604: Early Republic <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Elective ***CLASS CLOSED***

Having adopted a form of government, the Americans had to make it work. This course examines their efforts to do so, as the Republic took shape amidst foreign dangers, political conflict, westward expansion and religious revivals.

Instructors:

David Tucker (U.S. Naval Postgraduate School)

Stephen Knott (U.S. Naval War College)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 18.7 MB)

AHG 630B: American Statesmen: Woodrow Wilson & Franklin Roosevelt <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Elective ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course examines the lives, character, political thought and political practice of two of the most influential American thinkers and statesmen in the twentieth century, viz., Woodrow Wilson and Franklin Roosevelt. We will pay close attention to their views of the Constitution, especially in light of their understandings of liberty and rights, democratic self-government, enlightened administration, and the character and responsibilities of the presidential office.

Instructors:

Ronald J. Pestritto (Hillsdale College)

Christopher Burkett (Ashland University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 23.4 MB)

AHG 641: The Supreme Court <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Elective ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course is an intensive study of the highest court in the federal judiciary, focusing on the place of the Supreme Court in the American constitutional order. Areas of study may include the relationship between the Court and the other branches of the federal government as well as the states; the Court’s power of judicial review; and judicial politics and statesmanship. We will examine these kinds of issues by investigating how the Court has interpreted the Constitution in some of its most historic decisions.

Instructors:

Jeffrey Sikkenga (Ashland University)

James R. Stoner (Louisiana State University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus REVISED – 7/8/10

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 10.2 MB) REVISED – 7/8/10

Supplemental Course Packet (PDF – 4.1 MB) REVISED – 7/8/10


Session Five: Sunday, July 18, 2010 to Friday, July 23, 2010

AHG 505B: The Progressive Era <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructors:

Ronald J. Pestritto (Hillsdale College)

William Atto (University of Dallas)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 11.6 MB)

AHG 510E: Great American Texts: Democracy in America <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America is the best study of America to be written by a foreigner. It examines government, religion, the races, private associations, literature, the family, and much else, all the while contrasting democratic America with old aristocratic Europe. This course will examine as much of the book as we can, focusing especially on Tocqueville’s account of the love of equality (and its dangers) and his prescriptions for the preservation of liberty.

Instructor:

Christopher Flannery (Azusa Pacific University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

There is no photocopied course packet for this course.

AHG 510F: Great American Texts: Uncle Tom’s Cabin <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course illuminates one area of American political thought. The topic will be Harriet Stowe’s moral account of freedom and the reasoning associated with it. The focus will be on Uncle Tom’s Cabin, albeit referencing several of Stowe’s writings. We will establish a context for the discussion by reviewing Frederick Douglass’s powerful question, “What country have I?”, and the political, religious, and cultural contexts in which Uncle Tom’s Cabin was written. The goal is to understand just how Stowe came to formulate her ideas and why she had the impact on American society that she did. Also to be considered is whether the philosophical ideas that informed her work bear any direct responsibility for the political events that unfolded as a result of her work.

Instructor:

William B. Allen (Michigan State University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 6.7 MB)

AHG 611: The American Way of War – The Twentieth Century <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Elective ***CLASS CLOSED***

The course examines how the United States has waged war and engaged in armed conflict in the twentieth century. It examines how American principles and institutions have affected America’s use of force and how security problems and the use of force have shaped our institutions and challenged our principles. The course covers both major and small wars, as well as terrorism, insurgency, and covert action.

Instructors:

David Tucker (U.S. Naval Postgraduate School)

Christopher J. Lamb (National Defense University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus REVISED – 5/21/10

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 26.1 MB)

Supplemental Course Packet (PDF – 6.4 MB)

AHG 620: The Reform Tradition in America <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Elective ***CLASS CLOSED***

The United States has experienced three periods of sustained interest in reforming its political and social life: the first in the decades preceding the Civil War, the second in the decades preceding the First World War, and the third in the two decades following World War II. The course examines aspects of these reform movements, particularly their connection to religion and Protestant theology.

Instructors:

Robert Norrell (University of Tennessee)

Natalie F. Taylor (Skidmore College)

Course Materials:

Syllabus REVISED – 5/21/2010

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 17.25 MB) REVISED – 6/2/2010

AHG 642: Political Parties <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Elective ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course examines the development of American political parties, focusing on the meaning of parties and historic moments in the rise and fall of political parties from the Founding Era to the present. Topics may include re-aligning elections, changing coalitions within American parties, and the contemporary Democratic and Republican parties.

Instructors:

Marc Landy (Boston College)

Stephen R. Thomas (Ohio Dominican University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus REVISED – 5/21/2010

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 42.7 MB)


Session Six: Sunday, July 25, 2010 to Friday, July 30, 2010

AHG 503B: Sectionalism and Civil War <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the Civil War, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructors:

Dan Monroe (Millikin University)

Kevin Portteus (Hillsdale College)

Course Materials:

Syllabus REVISED – 5/21/10

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 11.1 MB)

Supplemental Course Packet (PDF – 1.7 MB)

AHG 510G: Great American Texts: Abraham Lincoln <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Core ***CLASS CLOSED***

Abraham Lincoln wove his words into the fabric of American history. In the twenty-first century, Lincoln’s political language remains more contemporary than all but the most timeless of the political language of the American Founding. This course is a study of selected Lincoln speeches aiming to illuminate Lincoln’s understanding of the relation of the principles of the American Founding to the most pressing issues of his day.

Instructor:

Christopher Flannery (Azusa Pacific University)

Course Materials:

SyllabusRevised 6/15/2010

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 0.4 MB) – Revised 6/15/2010

AHG 605: The Age of Enterprise <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Elective ***CLASS CLOSED***

In the last decades of the 19th Century, the United States took decisive steps away from its rural, agrarian past toward its industrial future, assuming its place among world powers. This course examines that movement, covering such topics as business-labor relations, political corruption, immigration, imperialism, the New South, and segregation and racism.

Instructors:

David Beito (University of Alabama)

Burton Folsom (Hillsdale College)

Course Materials:

Syllabus

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 29.9 MB)

Supplemental Course Packet (PDF – 11.3 MB)

 

AHG 633: The American Presidency II: Johnson to Present <!–(Syllabus; PDF Syllabus)–> — Elective ***CLASS CLOSED***

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from Reconstruction to the present. It focuses on how changing conceptions of the presidency have shaped American political life in the 19th and 20th centuries, especially as America has become a global power.

Instructors:

Marc Landy (Boston College)

Jeremy D. Bailey (University of Houston)

Course Materials:

Syllabus REVISED – 5/21/10

Syllabus (PDF)

Course Packet (PDF – 0.1 MB)

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