2011 Summer Institutes

Session One: Sunday, June 19, 2011 to Friday, June 24, 2011

AHG 502A: The American Founding

This course is an intensive study of the Constitutional Convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of The Federalist and the anti-federalist papers.

Instructor:
Christopher Burkett (Ashland University)
Guest Lecturer:
Gordon Lloyd (Pepperdine University)

Course Materials:
Syllabus
Course Packet (PDF – 35 MB)

AHG 503A: Sectionalism and Civil WarCore <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. This course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the Civil War, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructors:

Michael Burlingame (University of Illinois Springfield)

Lucas Morel (Washington and Lee University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 31 MB)
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Supplemental Course Packet (PDF – .7 MB)–>

AHG 504A: Civil War and ReconstructionCore <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructors:

Mackubin T. Owens (U.S. Naval War College)

Dan Monroe (Millikin University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 17 MB)

Supplemental Course Packet (PDF – 4.1 MB)

AHG 510A: Great American Texts: Democracy in AmericaCore <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America is commonly regarded as the most profound study of America ever written. Seeing “in America more than America,” Tocqueville studies America to understand the nature of modern democracy itself. In the course of his discussion, he examines, among many other subjects, America’s democratic social condition, its constitutional federalism, the problem of majority tyranny in America, the troubled relations among its racial groups, the prevailing understanding of sexual equality, the relation of religion and government, the powerful love of material well-being, and the dangers of administrative centralization and “mild despotism.” This course will examine Tocqueville’s treatments of these and other subjects in extensive excerpts from his book, all with a larger view toward understanding his descriptive account of democracy in America, his analysis of the main dangers it faces, and his suggestions as to the proper remedies for those dangers-the means for preserving and enhancing liberty in a nation dedicated to the principle of political and social equality.

Instructor:

Peter C. Myers (University of Wisonsin-Eau Claire)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

There is no photocopied course packet for this course.

AHG 630A: American Statesmen: John Marshall and Earl WarrenElective <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

This course examines the lives, character, and jurisprudence of two of the most consequential Chief Justices of the United States: John Marshall and Earl Warren. Among the issues to be addressed in this course will be the personal and professional backgrounds of Marshall and Warren; their involvement with the political and constitutional issues of their respective times; their view of law and the Constitution; and, the ultimate impact that each had on the Supreme Court as an institution and on its interpretation of the Constitution. The course will involve studying their biographies as well as reading some of their most important political writings and Supreme Court opinions.

Instructors:

Jeffrey Sikkenga (Ashland University)

Joshua Dunn (University of Colorado at Colorado Springs)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF) –>

Course Packet (PDF – 44 MB)

Supplemental Course Packet


Session Two: Sunday, June 26, 2011 to Friday, July 1, 2011

AHG 501A: The American RevolutionCore <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructors:

Mickey Craig (Hillsdale College)

Natalie Taylor (Skidmore College)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 6.3 MB)

AHG 505A: The Progressive EraCore <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructors:

John Moser (Ashland University)

J. David Alvis (Wofford College)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 2.8 MB)

AHG 510B: Great American Texts: George WashingtonCore ***CLASS CLOSED***

George Washington’s political philosophy—radical for his time—was a commitment to the belief that law can never make just what is in its nature unjust. Before the close of the Revolutionary War, he had conceived of a union based on the progressive principle that the American people would qualify for self-government in the sense of free institutions in proportion to their moral capacity to govern themselves by the light of reason. This course traces Washington’s political development through the war years, describes his contributions to the Constitution and the founding of the United States, addresses Washington’s relationship to the institution of slavery, and touches his presidential administration including his precedent-setting decision to retire from the presidency after two terms.

Instructor:

Michael Schwarz (Ashland University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 0.4 MB)

AHG 510C: Great American Texts: The FederalistCore <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

The Federalist is a complex political work comprised of arguments about war, economics, national unity, and liberty (among other things) based on appeals to human nature, history, reason, and prudence. In this course we will examine and discuss The Federalist as fully and as deeply we can, aiming to understand how (or whether) its parts fit together in a coherent whole and its enduring contribution to our understanding of politics.

Instructor:

David Foster (Ashland University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

There is no photocopied course packet for this course.

AHG 510D: Great American Texts: William Faulkner and Flannery O’ConnorCore <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

William Faulkner and Flannery O’Connor provide a unique perspective on the complex culture of the American South, a culture shaped across time by geography, the economics of an agricultural society often at odds with the dominant culture of American capitalism, and a complicated social system arising from the interaction among three groups: whites of different social classes; African-Americans originally held in bondage and still relegated to a status of social inferiority long after emancipation; and native peoples displaced by the early migration of whites to the west. Faulkner’s Yoknapatawpha County of northwest Mississippi is a fictional microcosm of the Deep South based on the memory of an organic society. O’Connor, a devout Roman Catholic in Protestant Georgia, uses literary grotesque and irony to examine what might be called the “crossroads of time and the timeless.” Both authors examine the “soul” of the American South and help us to understand that region’s complex relationship with the rest of the country.

Instructor:

Mackubin T. Owens (U.S. Naval War College)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 5 MB)

AHG 621: Race and Equality in AmericaElective <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

This course will explore the history of black Americans as they strove to secure their dignity as human beings, and rights as American citizens, in the face of racial prejudice. It will examine the diverse viewpoints of leading black intellectuals and activists on human equality, slavery, self-government, the rule of law, emancipation, colonization, and citizenship. Contemporary issues to be considered may include affirmative action, black reparations, racial profiling, and the “achievement gap” in education.

Instructors:

Lucas E. Morel (Washington and Lee University)

Peter C. Myers (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 25.8 MB)
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Supplemental Course Packet (PDF – 22.1 MB)–>

AHG 633: The American Presidency II: Johnson to PresentElective <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from Reconstruction to the present. It focuses on how changing conceptions of the presidency have shaped American political life in the 19th and 20th centuries, especially as America has become a global power.

Instructors:

Stephen Knott (U.S. Naval War College)

Jeremy D. Bailey (University of Houston)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 0.1 MB)


Session Three: Sunday, July 3, 2011 to Friday, July 8, 2011

AHG 510E: Great American Texts: Madison’s Notes of Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787Core <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

From May 25 to September 17, 1787, delegates from twelve of the thirteen independent United States of America met in the State House in Philadelphia deliberating in secret about “the situation of the United States” and considering what measures might be necessary to “render the Constitution of the federal government adequate to the exigencies of the Union.” The result of their deliberations was the Constitution of the United States that remains the supreme law of the land to this day. James Madison’s “Notes” are by far the best record we have of these deliberations. They are one of the most authoritative records we have of the intentions of the framers of the Constitution when they were drafting that document. In this course we will study these “Notes” as thoroughly as we can, aiming at a fuller understanding of the Constitution and the founding statesmanship that produced it.

Instructor:

Christopher Flannery (Azusa Pacific University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

There is no photocopied course packet for this course.

AHG 622: Religion in American History and PoliticsElective <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

From the time that the first Europeans arrived in America, religion has been an important part of American life. This course examines the various ways in which religion has played a role in American history, with particular emphasis on the role of religion in American politics.

Instructors:

Ken Masugi (Johns Hopkins University)

David Tucker (U.S. Naval Postgraduate School)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 19 MB)

AHG 660A: Topics in American History and Government – Post-Vietnam AmericaElective <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

The 1960s and early 1970s marked a rapid transformation of American society and its government. Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society and War on Poverty continued the transformation of the relationship between the government and the governed begun by the New Deal. The movement for black Civil Rights seemed to finally fulfill the promise of political equality begun a hundred years before. By the mid-1970s, however, the domestic economy languished, American prestige eroded at home and abroad, the societal effects of segregation remained unresolved, and events like the Vietnam War and Watergate provoked in the emerging Baby Boomer generation a profound distrust of government and of the older generation. This course will examine the US as it adapts and reacts to the rapid change of the 1960s, while simultaneously facing new domestic and foreign policy challenges.

Instructors:

Steven Hayward (American Enterprise Institute)

Stephen Knott (U.S. Naval War College)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 1 MB)


Session Four: Sunday, July 10, 2011 to Friday, July 15, 2011

AHG 504B: Civil War and ReconstructionCore <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

This course will examine military aspects of the war, as well as political developments during it, including the political history of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. The course also examines the post-war amendments and the Reconstruction era.

Instructors:

Matthew Norman (Gettysburg College)

Dan Monroe (Millikin University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 30 MB)
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Supplemental Course Packet (PDF – 19.1 MB)–>

AHG 510F: Great American Texts: Abraham LincolnCore <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

Abraham Lincoln wove his words into the fabric of American history. In the twenty-first century, Lincoln’s political language remains more contemporary than all but the most timeless of the political language of the American Founding. This course is a study of selected Lincoln speeches aiming to illuminate Lincoln’s understanding of the relation of the principles of the American Founding to the most pressing issues of his day.

Instructor:

Christopher Flannery (Azusa Pacific University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – < 1 MB)

AHG 510G: Great American Texts: Mark TwainCore <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

One way citizens of large republics are educated in the principles of government is through novels. With this in mind, this course examines selections from the work of Mark Twain. Not only is Twain America’s most enduringly popular author, but his novels depict important aspects of the American character and have much to say about such themes as equality, slavery, freedom, modern science, Christianity, and democratic leadership, all of which are crucial for understanding American history and politics.

Instructor:

David Foster (Ashland University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

There is no photocopied course packet for this course.

AHG 606: America Between World WarsElective <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

In the 1920s, changes in America that had been underway for several decades came fully into view. This is the period when cultural wars first appeared (e.g., The Scopes Trial) and the transformative effects of industrial capitalism touched every part of American life. In the 1930s, an economic crisis challenged received views of the proper relationship of the government to the economy. The course examines various political and economic changes that occurred in this period, with a special emphasis on the New Deal.

Instructors:

David Krugler (University of Wisconsin-Plattville)

Gregory Schneider (Emporia State University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF))–>

Course Packet (PDF – 18.7 MB)

AHG 632: American Presidency I: Washington to LincolnElective <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from the Founding era through the Civil War. It focuses on how the presidency shaped American political life as the country grew and struggled with rising sectional tensions.

Instructors:

Marc Landy (Boston College)

Jeremy D. Bailey (University of Houston)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF) –>

Course Packet (PDF – 1.3 MB)

AHG 660B: Topics in American History and Government – America and Its MusicElective ***CLASS CLOSED***

Jefferson believed that the spirit of the people was the heart of republican government. If music is an expression of the spirit, what does American music reveal about America? How has America shaped the music, the spirit, of its people? The course addresses these questions through a selective examination of some American music and some distinctive episodes in American History. The course includes some discussion of music theory but no specialized knowledge of music is necessary.

Instructors:

John Moser (Ashland University)

David Tucker (U.S. Naval Postgraduate School)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 57.7 MB)

AHG 660C: Topics in American History and Government – The American WesternElective <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

This course is an intensive study of several classic American Westerns, in both print and film. The American Western reflects something fundamental about both the American mind and the American regime. The Western’s emphasis on courage and self-reliance, for example, arises from that same American character that forms the basis of self-government. The American Western also raises important questions central to American political life, among which are the meaning of justice, equality, and liberty. This course will also address the question of how American politics both influences and is influenced by literature in the Western genre.

Instructors:

Christopher Burkett (Ashland University)

John Marini (University of Nevada, Reno)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF) –>

Course Packet (PDF – 57.7 MB)


Session Five: Sunday, July 17, 2011 to Friday, July 22, 2011

AHG 501B: The American RevolutionCore <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructors:

Robert M.S. McDonald (U.S. Military Academy)

Todd Estes (Oakland University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 1.4 MB)

AHG 503B: Sectionalism and Civil WarCore <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the Civil War, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructors:

Michael Schwarz (Ashland University)

Kevin Portteus (Hillsdale College)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 8 MB)
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Supplemental Course Packet (PDF – 1.7 MB)–>

AHG 505B: The Progressive EraCore <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructors:

Ronald J. Pestritto (Hillsdale College)

William Atto (University of Dallas)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 11 MB)

AHG 510H: Great American Texts: Ralph EllisonCore <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952) is the great American novel about race, perhaps even the great American novel. It considers and affirms the principle—that “mysterious binding force”—that holds us together as a people and that is tied to our own history. In doing so it raises all the important political questions about equality, freedom, rights and justice; the legacy of slavery and white supremacy, our “human and absurd diversity.” The novel’s deliberate attempt, in Ellison’s words, “to return to the mood of personal moral responsibility for democracy” makes perfectly clear the connection between literature and politics. The seminar will also consider a few of Ellison’s essays bearing directly on Invisible Man.

Instructor:

Peter W. Schramm (Ashland University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – < 1 MB)

AHG 642: Political PartiesElective <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

This course examines the development of American political parties, focusing on the meaning of parties and historic moments in the rise and fall of political parties from the Founding Era to the present. Topics may include re-aligning elections, changing coalitions within American parties, and the contemporary Democratic and Republican parties.

Instructors:

Marc Landy (Boston College)

Stephen R. Thomas (Ohio Dominican University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF) –>

Course Packet (PDF – 20 MB)


Session Six: Sunday, July 24, 2011 to Friday, July 29, 2011

AHG 502B: The American FoundingCore <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

This course is an intensive study of the Constitutional Convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of The Federalist and the anti-federalist papers.

Instructors:

J. David Alvis (Wofford College)

James R. Stoner, Jr. (Louisiana State University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 15 MB)

AHG 630B: American Statesmen: Theodore Roosevelt & Woodrow WilsonElective <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

This course examines the lives, character, political thought and political practice of the two American presidents most closely associated with the progressive movement: Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson. While each can rightly be considered a “progressive”, their approaches to reform both in and out of the presidency are markedly different. As we examine their actions and philosophies in both domestic and foreign policies, we will pay close attention to their views of the Constitution, especially in light of their understandings of liberty and rights, democratic self-government, enlightened administration, and the character and responsibilities of the presidential office.

Instructors:

Ronald J. Pestritto (Hillsdale College)

Scott Yenor (Boise State University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 13 MB)

AHG 640: The CongressElective <!–***CLASS CLOSED***–>

This course focuses on the legislative branch of the U.S. government. It examines topics such as the constitutional powers of Congress, the relations between Congress and the other branches of the federal government and the states, and the changing structure and internal politics of Congress.

Instructors:

Andrew Busch (Claremont McKenna College)

Randall Strahan (Emory University)

Course Materials:

Syllabus
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Syllabus (PDF)–>

Course Packet (PDF – 4 MB)

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