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Alexander Martin

Alexander MartinState: North Carolina (Born in New Jersey)

Age at Convention: 47

Date of Birth: 1740

Date of Death: November 2, 1807

Schooling: College of New Jersey (Princeton) 1756, M.A. 1759

Occupation: Politician, Lawyer, Planter, Educator

Prior Political Experience: State second branch of North Carolina 1779-1782 & 1785, Speaker of the House 1780-1782, Acting Governor of North Carolina 1781-1782, Governor of North Carolina 1782-1785

Committee Assignments: None

Convention Contributions: Arrived May 25, departed August 25, and never returned to the Convention. William Pierce stated that "he is a Man of sense, and undoubtedly is a good politician, but he is not formed to shine in public debate, being no Speaker."

New Government Participation: Served as one of the first Senators for North Carolina (1793-1799).


Biography from the National Archives: Though he represented North Carolina at the Constitutional Convention, Alexander Martin was born in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, in 1740. His parents, Hugh and Jane Martin, moved first to Virginia, then to Guilford County, North Carolina, when Alexander was very young. Martin attended the College of New Jersey (later Princeton), received his degree in 1756, and moved to Salisbury. There he started his career as a merchant but turned to public service as he became justice of the peace, deputy king's attorney, and, in 1774 and 1775, judge of Salisbury district.

At the September 1770 session of the superior court at Hillsboro, 150 Regulators armed with sticks, switches, and cudgels crowded into the courtroom. They had come to present a petition to the judge demanding unprejudiced juries and a public accounting of taxes by sheriffs. Violence erupted, and several, including Alexander Martin, were beaten. In 1771, Martin signed an agreement with the Regulators to refund all fees taken illegally and to arbitrate all differences.

From 1773 to 1774 Martin served in the North Carolina House of Commons and in the second and third provincial congresses in 1775. In September 1775 he was appointed a lieutenant colonel in the 2nd North Carolina Continental Regiment. Martin saw military action in South Carolina and won promotion to a colonelcy. He joined Washington's army in 1777, but after the Battle of Germantown he was arrested for cowardice. A court-martial tried and acquitted Martin, but he resigned his commission on November 22, 1777.

Martin's misfortune in the army did not impede his political career. The year after his court-martial he entered the North Carolina Senate, where he served for 8 years (1778-82, 1785, and 1787-88). For every session except those of 1778-79, Martin served as speaker. From 1780 to 1781 he also sat on the Board of War and its successor, the Council Extraordinary. In 1781 Martin became acting governor of the state, and in 1782 through 1785 he was elected in his own right.

After his 1785 term in the North Carolina Senate, Martin represented his state in the Continental Congress, but he resigned in 1787. Of the five North Carolina delegates to the Constitutional Convention, Martin was the least strongly Federalist. He did not take an active part in the proceedings, and he left Philadelphia in late August 1787, before the Constitution was signed. Martin was considered a good politician but not suited to public debate. A colleague, Hugh Williamson, remarked that Martin needed time to recuperate after his great exertions as governor "to enable him again to exert his abilities to the advantage of the nation."

Under the new national government, Martin again served as Governor of North Carolina, from 1789 until 1792. After 1790, he moved away from the Federalists to the Republicans. In 1792, Martin, elected by the Republican legislature, entered the U.S. Senate. His vote in favor of the Alien and Sedition Acts cost him reelection. Back in North Carolina, Martin returned to the state senate in 1804 and 1805 to represent Rockingham County. In 1805 he once again served as speaker. From 1790 until 1807, he was a trustee of the University of North Carolina. Martin never married, and he died on November 2, 1807 at the age of 67 at his plantation, "Danbury," in Rockingham County and was buried on the estate.