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Robert Morris's Town Home
(Sixth & Market Streets)

Robert Morris's Town Home Robert Morris, "financier of the Revolution," and born in Britain, purchased the house in 1785 and shared it with George Washington during the Constitutional Convention of 1787. Despite Washington's heavy social and political calendar, he dined with Morris on most evenings during the summer of 1787. Morris's house was also the "President's House" of the United States from 1790 to 1800: Washington and John Adams resided here during their presidencies.

Robert Morris's Town Home

Modern Day Appearance of the Site of Morris's Town Home Modern Day Bathroom on the Corner of Market and Fifth Street in the 1980s
A public bathroom occupied the site during the second half of the twentieth century. This building was demolished around 2000. The above is a photo of a modern-day public bathroom on the corner of Market and Fifth Streets in the 1980s, but it is probably very similar to the one that used to stand on the corner of Market and Sixth Streets on the site of Morris's Town Home.
Site of Morris's Town Home Modern View of the Site of Morris's Town Home
The photo above is a modern view of the site of Morris's Town House. The reconstructed site opened officially on December 15, 2010 after a decade of extensive discussion among various civic organizations and community representatives. The site is literally open to the public 24/7 since it is not enclosed. It is now known as "President's House: Freedom and Slavery in the Making of a New Nation."

According to its supporters, the site is a "homage" to nine enslaved Africans, owned by President Washington, who lived and worked in cramped quarters in a nation dedicated to freedom. They wish to expose a "Great Contradiction": slavery in the presence of freedom. Detractors respond that the site has very little to do with the Washington and Adams Presidencies and little effort is made to integrate the site into the story of liberty and slavery already represented elsewhere on Independence Mall. They point, for example, to the pavilion containing the Liberty Bell.
View South from the Site of Morris's Town Home
Looking south from the President's House is an unobstructed early twenty-first century view of the Liberty Bell Pavilion.
View North from the Site of Morris's Town Home
Looking north is the Independence Hall Visitor's Center also taken in the early twenty-first century with Jefferson's draft of the Declaration of Independence visible on the outside wall of the building. Also visible to the north is the National Constitutional Center (seen below) where a room is dedicated to life-sized statues of the Framers.
View North from the Site of Morris's Town Home