Menu

A Timeline of the Essential Antifederalist Papers

Cato I

September 27, 1787

“To the CITIZENS of the STATE of NEW-YORK”

Read more

Centinel I

October 5, 1787

“To the Freemen of Pennsylvania Friends, Countrymen and Fellow Citizens, Permit one of yourselves to put you in mind of certain liberties and privileges secured to you by the constitution of this commonwealth, and to beg your serious attention to his uninterested opinion upon the plan of federal government…before you surrender these great and valuable privileges up forever.”

Read more

Federal Farmer I

October 8, 1787

Published in Virginia.

Read more

Federal Farmer IV

October 12, 1787

Published in Virginia.

Read more

Brutus I

October 18, 1787

“To the Citizens of the State of New-York”

Read more

An Old Whig IV

October 27, 1787

Pennsylvania – “It is beyond a doubt that the new federal constitution, if adopted, will in a great measure destroy, if it do not totally annihilate, the separate governments of the several states.”

Read more

An Old Whig V

November 1, 1787

Philadelphia Independent Gazette – “…In order that people may be sufficiently impressed, with the necessity of establishing a BILL OF RIGHTS in the forming of a new constitution, it is very proper to take a short view of some of those liberties…”

Read more

Brutus II

November 1, 1787

New York – “I flatter myself that my last address established this position, that to reduce the Thirteen States into one government, would prove the destruction of your liberties.”

Read more

Brutus III

November 15, 1787

New York – “In the investigation of the constitution, under your consideration, great care should be taken, that you do not form your opinions respecting it, from unimportant provisions, or fallacious appearances.”

Read more

Cato V

November 22, 1787

Published in the New York Journal.

Read more

Brutus IV

November 29, 1787

“To the People of the State of New-York. There can be no free government where the people are not possessed of the power of making the laws by which they are governed, either in their own persons, or by others substituted in their stead.”

Read more

Brutus V

December 13, 1787

“To the People of the State of New-York – It was intended in this Number to have prosecuted the enquiry into the organization of this new system; particularly to have considered the dangerous and premature union of the President and Senate, and the mixture of legislative, executive, and judicial powers in the Senate.”

Read more

Agrippa VII

December 18, 1787

“To the people” [of Massachusetts]  

Read more

The Dissent of the Minority of the Convention of Pennsylvania

December 18, 1787

Excerpts

Read more

Brutus IX

January 17, 1788

New York – “The design of civil government is to protect the rights and promote the happiness of the people”

Read more

Brutus XI

January 31, 1788

New York – “The nature and extent of the judicial power of the United States, proposed to be granted by this constitution, claims our particular attention”

Read more

Brutus XV

March 20, 1788

New York – “I said in my last number, that the supreme court under this constitution would be exalted above all other power in the government, and subject to no controul”

Read more

Get Email Updates

TeachingAmericanHistory.org is a project of the Ashbrook Center at Ashland University

401 College Avenue | Ashland, Ohio 44805 (419) 289-5411 | (877) 289-5411 (Toll Free)

info@TeachingAmericanHistory.org