Ratifications of the Amendments to the Constitution of the United States

MONDAY, November 14.

The following Message from the President of the United States was received:

Gentlemen of the Senate, and of the House of Representatives:

I have received from the Governor of Virginia a Resolution of the General Assembly of that Commonwealth, ratifying the first article of the amendments proposed by Congress to the Constitution of the United States. A copy of which, and of the letter accompanying it, I now lay before you.

Sundry papers, relating to the purchase, by Judge Symmes, of the lands on the Great Miami, having been communicated to me, I have thought it proper to lay the same before you, for your information on that subject.

G. WASHINGTON.

UNITED STATES, November 11, 1791.

The Resolution of the State of Virginia, referred to in the Message, is as follows:

IN THE HOUSE OF DELEGATES,

Tuesday, October 25, 1791.

Resolved, That the first article of the amendments proposed by Congress to the Constitution of the United States be ratified by this Commonwealth.

Test,     CHARLES HAY, C.H.D.

November 3, 1791 — Agreed to by the Senate.

H. BROOKE, C.S.


FRIDAY, December 30.

The following Message from the President of the United States was received:

Gentlemen of the Senate, and of the House of Representatives:

I lay before you a copy of the ratification, by the Commonwealth of Virginia, of the articles of amendment proposed by Congress to the Constitution of the United States, and a copy of a Letter which accompanied said ratification, from the Governor of Virginia.

G. WASHINGTON.

UNITED STATES, December 30, 1791.

The papers referred to in the Message are as follow:

COUNCIL CHAMBER,
Richmond, Dec. 22, 1791.

SIR: The General Assembly, during their late session, have adopted, on the part of this Commonwealth, all the amendments proposed by Congress to the Constitution of the United States; their ratification whereof I do myself the honor herewith to transmit.

I have the honor to be, &c.,

HENRY LEE.

The PRESIDENT of the United States.

VIRGINIA:

General Assembly, begun and held at the Capitol, in the city of Richmond, on Monday, the 17th day of October, in the year of our Lord 1791.

MONDAY, December 5, 1791.

Resolved, That the second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth, eleventh, and twelfth articles of the amendments proposed by Congress to the Constitution of the United States, be ratified by this Commonwealth.

December 15, 1791: Agreed to by the Senate.

JOHN PRIDE, S.S.
Examined. THOS. MATTHEWS, S.H.D.


WEDNESDAY, January 18.

The following Message from the President of the United States was received:

Gentlemen of the Senate, and of the House of Representatives:

I lay before you a copy of an exemplified copy of an Act of the Legislature of Vermont, ratifying, on behalf of that State, the articles of amendment proposed by Congress to the Constitution of the United States, together with a copy of a letter which accompanied said ratification.

G. WASHINGTON.

UNITED STATES, January 18, 1792.

The act of ratification referred to in the foregoing Message is as follows:

An act ratifying certain articles proposed by Congress as amendments to the Constitution of the United States.

Whereas the Congress of the United States, begun and held at the city of New York, on Wednesday the 4th of March, 1789, resolved, that certain articles, to the number of twelve, be proposed to the Legislatures of the several States, as amendments to the Constitution of the United States, which articles, when ratified by-three-fourths of the said Legislatures, should be valid, to all intents and purposes, as part of the said Constitution: therefore,

It is hereby enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Vermont, that all and every of said articles, so proposed as aforesaid, be, and the same are hereby, ratified and confirmed by the Legislature of this State.

STATE OF VERMONT,
Secretary of State’s Office.

I hereby certify, that the within is a true copy of an Act passed by the Legislature of this State, the 3d day of November, 1791, and deposited in this office according to law.

Attest, ROS. HOPKINS, Secretary.

Contents

Introduction

Introductions, the documentary history of each amendment, and major themes about the adoption of the Bill of Rights.

From Political Liberty to Social Freedom

Using artwork, see how the idea of rights has changed throughout American history.

View Feature

Documentary Origins and Politics of the Bill of Rights

Interactive chart showing the origins of each of the rights in the Bill of Rights.

View Interactive

TeachingAmericanHistory.org is a project of the Ashbrook Center at Ashland University

401 College Avenue | Ashland, Ohio 44805 (419) 289-5411 | (877) 289-5411 (Toll Free)

info@TeachingAmericanHistory.org