Delegates to the Constitutional Convention:Roger Sherman

 

Roger ShermanState: Connecticut (Born in Massachusetts)

Age at Convention: 66

Date of Birth: April 19, 1721

Date of Death: July 23, 1793

Schooling: No formal legal education, Honorary MA from Yale 1768

Occupation: Lawyer, Merchant, Public Security Interests, Cobbler

Prior Political Experience: State Upper House of Connecticut 1766-1785, Connecticut Superior Court 1766-1789, Signed the Declaration of Independence, Signed Articles of Confederation, Member of Continental Congress 1774-1781, Confederation Congress 1783-1784, Mayor of Newhaven 1784-1786

Committee Assignments: First Committee of Representation (served for Oliver Ellsworth), Third Committee of Representation, Committee on Assumption of State Debt, Chairman of Committee of Trade, Committee of Leftovers

Convention Contributions: Arrived May 30, and except for a brief absence in late July, was present until he signed the Constitution. He was one of two delegates who signed all three of the nation’s documents. He debated with James Madison over the representation issue and was influential in securing the passage of the Connecticut Compromise. William Pierce stated that “the oddity of his address, the vulgarisms that accompany his public speaking, and the strange New England Kant which runs through his public as well as his private speaking make everything that is connected to him grotesque and laughable; and yet he deserves infinite praise, no Man has a better Heart or a clearer Head.”

New Government Participation: Wrote on behalf of ratification of the Constitution and attended the Ratification Convention. Served as Connecticut’s Representative (1789 – 1791) and Senator (1791 – 1793).

Contents

Introduction

The year was 1787. The place: the State House in Philadelphia. This is the story of the framing of the federal Constitution.

The Convention

Read the four-act drama and day-by-day summary by Gordon Lloyd, as well as Madison’s Notes on the Convention.

Interactive Map of Historic Philadelphia in the Late 18th Century

Learn about historic Philadelphia and where the founders stayed, ate, and met.

View Interactive

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