Emigration of the Colored People of the United States

Martin R. Delany

The Condition, Elevation, Emigration, and Destiny of the Colored People of the United States

1852

That there have been people in all ages under certain circumstances that may be benefited by emigration, will be admitted; and that there are circumstances under which emigration is absolutely necessary to their political elevation, cannot be disputed.

This we see in the Exodus of the Jews from Egypt to the land of Judea; in the expedition of Dido and her followers from Tyre to Mauritania; and not to dwell upon hundreds of modern European examples, also in the ever memorable emigration of the Puritans in 1620 from Great Britain, the land of their birth, to the wilderness of the New World, at which may be fixed the beginning of emigration to this continent as a permanent residence.

This may be acknowledged; but to advocate the emigration of the colored people of the United States from their native homes, is a new feature in our history, and at first view, may be considered objectionable, as pernicious to our interests. This objection is at once removed, when reflecting on our condition as incontrovertibly shown in a foregoing part of this work. And we shall proceed at once to give the advantages to be derived from emigration to us as a people in preference to any other policy that we may adopt. This granted, the question will then be, Where will we go? This we conceive to be all important, of paramount consideration, and shall endeavor to show the most advantageous locality; and premises the recommendation, with the strictest advice against any countenance whatever, to the migration scheme of the so called Republic of Liberia.

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