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Spring 2018 Schedule

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Spring 2018 Session 1 (Online)

January 6 to March 2

AHG 501 O1A: The American Revolution (2)

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: S. Adam Seagrave (University of Missouri)

Schedule: Thursdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 502 O1A: The American Founding (2)

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: J. David Alvis (Wofford College)

Schedule: Mondays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 503 O1A: Sectionalism and Civil War (2)

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Dan Monroe (Millikin University)

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 505 O1A: The Progressive Era (2)

The transition to an industrial economy posed many problems for the United States. This course examines those problems and the responses to them that came to be known as progressivism. The course includes the study of World War I as a manifestation of progressive principles. The course emphasizes the political thought of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and their political expression of progressive principles.

Instructor: Christopher Burkett (Ashland University)

Schedule: Mondays & Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 7:50 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 506 O1A: The Rise of Modern America, 1914-1945 (2)

With the exception of the Civil War era, it is difficult to find another thirty-year period in U.S. history during which the nation underwent such dramatic change. In 1914 the United States was no more than a regional power, with a primarily rural demography and a relatively unobtrusive federal government. Thanks to the experience of two world wars, a major cultural conflict (the 1920s), and a disastrous economic crisis the country was transformed into the global economic and military power that it remains to this day. This course will examine the cultural, economic, military, and diplomatic events and trends of the period 1914-1945.

Instructor: Gregory Schneider (Emporia State University)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 510 O1A: Great American Texts – Martin Luther King, Jr. (2)

Standing under the immortalized gaze of Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King, Jr., told his fellow Americans, “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” With those words he epitomized the longings of a century-old struggle for equal rights, and he also provided the most memorable expression of the meaning and mission of America since the Gettysburg Address. In this course we undertake a close analysis of that and other speeches, writings, and major sermons by King, to the end of understanding how, and how far, King’s core ideas—concerning justice and law, liberty and democracy, race and humanity, even sin and redemption—constitute, as he says, “a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.”

Instructor: Peter C. Myers (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire)

Schedule: Mondays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 607 O1A: America during the Cold War (2)

The simmering conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union from 1945 to 1989 was the defining phenomenon of the age, affecting not only the country’s foreign policy but its politics, society, economy, and culture as well. In this course students will examine the most important events, ideas, and personalities of the 44 years from the end of World War II to the end of the Reagan administration.

Instructor: Eric Pullin (Carthage College)

Schedule: Mondays and Wednesdays, 8:15 pm to 9:50 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 630 O1A: American Statesmen – George Washington (2)

George Washington’s political philosophy—radical for his time—was a commitment to the belief that law can never make just what is in its nature unjust. Before the close of the Revolutionary War, he had conceived of a union based on the progressive principle that the American people would qualify for self-government in the sense of free institutions in proportion to their moral capacity to govern themselves by the light of reason. This course traces Washington’s political development through the war years, describes his contributions to the Constitution and the founding of the United States, addresses Washington’s relationship to the institution of slavery, and touches his presidential administration including his precedent-setting decision to retire from the presidency after two terms.

Instructor: William B. Allen (Michigan State University)

Schedule: Saturdays, 9:30 am to 12:45 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 642 O1A: Political Parties (2)

This course examines the development of American political parties, focusing on the meaning of parties and historic moments in the rise and fall of political parties from the Founding era to the present. Topics may include re-aligning elections, changing coalitions within American parties, and the contemporary Democratic and Republican parties.

Instructor: Eric C. Sands (Berry College)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 660 O1A: The Federalists & the Antifederalists (2)

This course will analyze the arguments set forth in print in the crucial years of 1787-1788 concerning the adoption of the newly proposed Constitution of the United States. Through a close reading of those texts we will attempt to identify the most important principles that animated the participants in the discussion, including the fundamental assumptions therein about the political order and human nature. The works read here have an authority of their own in connection with the great debate on ratification, and yet have an enduring quality that makes them not only useful but essential guides to understanding the development of political action and discourse over subsequent centuries in America.

Instructor: Jason W. Stevens (Ashland University)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

Spring 2018 Session 2 (Online)

March 3 to April 28

AHG 501 O2B: The American Revolution (2)

This course focuses on three topics: political developments in North America and the British empire and the arguments for and against independence, culminating in the Declaration of Independence; the Revolutionary War as a military, social and cultural event in the development of the American nation and state; and the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

Instructor: Scott Yenor (Boise State University)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 502 O2B: The American Founding (2)

This course is an intensive study of the constitutional convention, the struggle over ratification of the Constitution, and the creation of the Bill of Rights. It will include a close examination of the Federalist Papers and the antifederalist papers.

Instructor: Lauren Hall (Rochester Institute of Technology)

Schedule: Mondays, 7:15 pm to 10:30 pm ET (Please note new day and time)

Course Materials:

AHG 503 O2B: Sectionalism and Civil War (2)

A study of the sectional conflict beginning with the nullification crisis. The course will not only examine the political, social and economic developments in the period leading to the civil war, but will emphasize the political thought of Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Douglas, and John C. Calhoun.

Instructor: Dennis K. Boman (Lindenwood University)

Schedule: Mondays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 506 O2B: The Rise of Modern America, 1914-1945 (2)

With the exception of the Civil War era, it is difficult to find another thirty-year period in U.S. history during which the nation underwent such dramatic change. In 1914 the United States was no more than a regional power, with a primarily rural demography and a relatively unobtrusive federal government. Thanks to the experience of two world wars, a major cultural conflict (the 1920s), and a disastrous economic crisis the country was transformed into the global economic and military power that it remains to this day. This course will examine the cultural, economic, military, and diplomatic events and trends of the period 1914-1945.

Instructor: David F. Krugler (University of Wisconsin-Platteville)

Schedule: Mondays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 510 O2B: Great American Texts: Abraham Lincoln (2)

Abraham Lincoln wove his words into the fabric of American history. In the twenty-first century, Lincoln’s political language remains more contemporary than all but the most timeless of the political language of the American Founding. This course is a study of selected Lincoln speeches aiming to illuminate Lincoln’s understanding of the relation of the principles of the American Founding to the most pressing issues of his day.

Instructor: Lucas E. Morel (Washington & Lee University)

Schedule: Thursdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 603 O2A: Colonial America (2)

This course focuses on the development of an indigenous political culture in the British colonies. It pays special attention to the development of representative political institutions and how these emerged through the confrontation between colonists and King and proprietors. The course also considers imperial politics through a study of the Albany Plan of Union.

Instructor: Sarah Morgan Smith (Ashbrook Center at Ashland University)

Schedule: Tuesdays, 8:15 pm to 11:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 632 O2A: The American Presidency I – Washington to Lincoln (2)

This course is an examination of the political and constitutional development of the office of president from the Founding era through the Civil War. It focuses on how the presidency shaped American political life as the country grew and struggled with rising sectional tensions.

Instructor: Stephen F. Knott (United States Naval War College)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 6:15 pm to 9:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

AHG 640 O2A: The Congress (2)

This course focuses on the legislative branch of the U.S. government. It examines topics such as the constitutional powers of Congress, the relations between Congress and the other branches of the federal government and the states, and the changing structure and internal politics of Congress.

Instructor: Sean Sutton (Rochester Institute of Technology)

Schedule: Wednesdays, 7:15 pm to 10:30 pm ET

Course Materials:

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