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William B. Allen is emeritus dean and Professor of Political Philosophy in the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University, and 2008-09 Visiting Senior Scholar in the Matthew J. Ryan Center for the Study of Free Institutions and the Public Good at Villanova University. He also served previously on the National Council for the Humanities and as Chairman and Member of the United States Commission on Civil Rights. He was recently the Ann & Herbert W. Vaughan Visiting Fellow in the James Madison Program on American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University. He is an expert on liberal arts education, its history, importance and problems. He is also Chairman and co-founder of Toward A Fair Michigan, whose mission was to further understanding of the equal opportunity issues involved in guaranteeing civil rights for all citizens, and to provide a civic forum for a fair and open exchange of views on the question of affirmative action.
Alvisjd David Alvis is Associate Professor of Political Science at Wofford College. He received his Ph.D. from Fordham University in New York in Political Science and his master’s in American Studies from the University of Dallas. At Wofford, he teaches courses on American Politics including: The American Presidency, Constitutional Law, and Political Parties. His publications include articles on the Electoral College, Progressivism and early twentieth century politics, and the Obama Presidency. He has also published articles on John Ford’s The Searchers and is currently completing a piece on Michelangelo’s David. With co-authors Jeremy Bailey and Flagg Taylor, he recently published the book The Contested Removal Power, 1789-2010.
Atto W William Atto is Associate Professor of History at the University of Dallas. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. His specialties include United States History with an emphasis on Nineteenth Century America, as well as the American Political, Military, and Intellectual History.
jeremy-bailey Jeremy Bailey (Associate Professor) holds the Ross M. Lence Distinguished Teaching Chair and has a dual appointment in Political Science and the Honors College at the University of Houston. His research interests include executive power, constitutionalism, and American political thought and development. His current book project is The Idea of Presidential Representation: An Intellectual and Political History. His major publications include James Madison and Constitutional Imperfection (Cambridge University Press, 2015), The Contested Removal Power, 1789-2010 (University Press of Kansas 2013, coauthored with David Alvis and Flagg Taylor), which was named a 2014 “Outstanding Academic Title” by Choice, “The New Unitary Executive and Democratic Theory,” (American Political Science Review 2008) and Thomas Jefferson and Executive Power (Cambridge University Press 2007)..
boman Dennis K. Boman teaches history at Lindenwood University in St. Charles, Missouri. He is currently working on a book about the 1858 Illinois campaign. Professor Boman is the author of Lincoln and Citizens’ Rights in Civil War Missouri: Balancing Freedom and Security (2011), for which he received the Missouri Humanity Council’s Distinguished Literary Achievement Award. Most recently he has published a biography of Rush Limbaugh Sr., the grandfather of the talk-show host, The Original Rush Limbaugh: Lawyer, Legislator, and Civil Libertarian (2012).
DSC_0031 Christopher Burkett is Associate Professor of Political Science at Ashland University, and teaches undergraduate courses on American political thought, the American Founding, and American foreign policy. He also serves as an Associate Director, Academic Advisor and instructor in the Master of American History and Government program at Ashland University, in which he teaches courses on the American Revolution, the American Founding, Western films and novels, and Franklin Roosevelt. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Ashland University, and received his M.A. in Politics from the University of Dallas and his Ph.D. from the Institute of Philosophic Studies, also at the University of Dallas. He joined the History and Political Science department at Ashland University in 2005, has been selected by students as Outstanding Faculty of the Year, and won the Edward and Louaine Taylor Excellence in Teaching Award in 2011..
DSC_0005 Todd Estes is Professor of History at Oakland University. His teaching specialty is early American history from the American Revolution through the Jacksonian era and his research concentrates on early U.S. political history and political culture. Estes is the author of the book The Jay Treaty Debate, Public Opinion, and the Evolution of Early American Political Culture (2006) in addition to the many articles and essays. Currently, he is working on a book about the debate over ratification of the U.S. Constitution in 1787-1788. Estes has won several teaching prizes including the 2001 Oakland University Teaching Excellence Award. In 2009, he was named a Distinguished Lecturer by the Organization of American Historians (OAH).
fornieri Joseph R. Fornieri (Associate Professor) is Professor of Political Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He is the author of Abraham Lincoln’s Political Faith (2005), an acclaimed scholarly work that explores Lincoln’s religion and politics. He is also the author or editor of three other books on Abraham Lincoln’s political thought and statesmanship: The Language of Liberty: The Political Speeches and Writings of Abraham Lincoln (2003; revised ed. 2009); (with Kenneth L. Deutsch) Lincoln’s American Dream: Clashing Political Perspectives (2005); and (with Sara V. Gabbard) Lincoln’s America, 1809-1865 (2008). In addition, Fornieri has co-edited (with Kenneth L. Deutsch) An Invitation to Political Thought (2009), an introductory text to the classic political thinkers of the Western tradition from Plato to Nietzsche. At RIT he teaches courses on American politics, political philosophy, and constitutional rights and liberties.
Daivd-Foster3 David Foster is Associate Professor of Political Science and Chair of the Department of History and Political Science, joined Ashland University in 1998. He teaches courses in political philosophy and international relations and, in the Masters of American History and Government program, courses on Alexis de Tocqueville, the political thought of Mark Twain, and the Federalist Papers. He has a Bachelor of Arts degree from McMaster University and a Master of Arts and PhD in political science from the University of Toronto.
004-Gypton-web-200x300 Jeremy Gypton joined the Ashbrook Center in 2014 as a Teacher Program Manager. Prior to his work with the Center he served as a high school administrator and curriculum leader for three years, and a teacher of a variety of Social Studies courses for 11 years in Tucson, Arizona. He has taught both Advanced Placement U.S. History and U.S. Government and Politics as well as Dual Enrollment courses for Pima Community College in Tucson. He has extensive experience in curriculum studies, teacher professional development, and instructional technology.
DSC_0297 Steven F. Hayward is Scholar in Residence at the University of Colorado at Boulder and the Thomas and Mabel Guy Professor of American History and Government at Ashland University. Prior to joining UC, he was the F.K. Weyerhaeuser Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. He is the author of a two volume biography of Ronald Reagan, The Age of Reagan: The Fall of the Old Liberal Order, 1964-1980 and The Age of Reagan: The Conservative Counterrevolution, 1980-1989. Additionally, he has written biographies on President Jimmy Carter and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill.
DSC_0011 Emily Hess (Associate Professor) joined Ashland University in 2007. She teaches American history with fields of expertise in 19th and 20th century African-American history, specifically the Reconstruction era and the Civil Rights movement. She was selected as Ashland’s Outstanding Female Faculty Member of the Year for 2014 and received Ashland University’s Mentor Award in January 2012 and 2015. She received her B.A. in American history at Malone University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in American history at Case Western Reserve University, where she received The Jayne and Cecil Lyman prize for best dissertation for 2013-2014.
014-Hubenschmidt-web-200x300 Michelle Hubenschmidt is one of two Teacher Programs managers with the Ashbrook Center. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in History and Secondary Education From the University of Michigan. She taught for 17 years with Polk County Schools, Florida at Mulberry Middle and Mulberry Senior High School, where she created the Advanced Placement curriculum for History and Government and directed many programs for new and seasoned teachers in areas of classroom management, curriculum and clinical supervision. She is a National Board Certified Teacher and holds a master’s degree in education from Cambridge College. Michelle received the James Madison Fellowship in 2010 and went on to earn a Master of American History and Government degree in 2012 from Ashland University. In 2013 the Sons of the American Revolution conferred their National History Teacher of the Year to her and she also received the 2013 Florida State History Teacher of the Year from the Florida Daughters of the American Revolution. Prior to Education, she spent 12 years in management and sales within the transportation industry and additionally presided over her own small trucking company.
jennifer-keene Jennifer Keene (Associate Professor) is a professor of history and chair of the History Department at Chapman University. She received her Ph.D. in History from Carnegie-Mellon University and is a specialist in American military experience during World War I. She received the Wang-Franklin Professorship for 2007-09, the highest faculty award given by Chapman University. Dr. Keene has published three books on the American involvement in the First World War, Doughboys, the Great War and the Remaking of America (2001), The United States and the First World War (2000), and World War I ( 2006). She is also the lead author for an America history textbook, Visions of America: A History of the United States. She is currently working on a book detailing the African American experience during the First World War and has another project comparing the experiences of soldiers from the French and British empires during World War I. Dr. Keene served as an associate editor for the Encyclopedia of War and American Society (2005) which won the Society of Military History’s prize for best military history reference book. She is on the advisory board of the International Society for First World War Studies and serves as the book review editor for the Journal of First World War Studies.
knott Stephen Knott (Associate Professor) is Professor of National Security Affairs at the United States Naval War College. He served as co-chair of the University of Virginia’s Presidential Oral History Program and directed the Ronald Reagan Oral History Project. Professor Knott received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Boston College, and has taught at the United States Air Force Academy and the University of Virginia. He is the author of Alexander Hamilton and the Persistence of Myth; Secret and Sanctioned: Covert Operations and the American Presidency; The Reagan Years; At Reagan’s Side: Insiders’ Recollections from Sacramento to the White House, and Rush to Judgment: George W. Bush, the War on Terror, and His Critics. His most recent book, Washington and Hamilton: The Alliance that Forged America, was co-authored with Tony Williams, and was published in September, 2015.
david_krugler David F. Krugler is Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin—Platteville. A historian of the modern United States, he has published books on several different topics: Cold War propaganda, nuclear warfare, and racial conflict in the United States. Krugler is the author of The Voice of America and the Domestic Propaganda Battles, 1945-1953(University of Missouri Press, 2000) and This Is Only a Test: How Washington, D.C., Prepared for Nuclear War (Palgrave Macmillan, 2006). In December 2014, Cambridge University Press released his third book, 1919, The Year of Racial Violence: How African Americans Fought Back. Krugler has served as a faculty leader for teacher education programs at the Newberry Library in Chicago and has made dozens of presentations to academic and public audiences. He is the past recipient of research grants and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Organization of American Historians, and the White House Historical Association. In Spring 2011, he was a fellow at the Institute for Research in the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin—Madison. In 2010, he appeared in the National Geographic Channel documentary American Doomsday.
lloyd Professor Gordon Lloyd earned his bachelor of arts degree in economics and political science at McGill University. He completed all the course work toward a doctorate in economics at the University of Chicago before receiving his master of arts and PhD degrees in government at Claremont Graduate School. The coauthor of three books on the American founding and sole author of a book on the political economy of the New Deal, he also has numerous articles, reviews, and opinion-editorials to his credit. His latest coauthored books are The Two Narratives of Political Economy (2010) and The New Deal and Modern American Conservatism: A Defining Rivalry (2013). He is the creator, with the help of the Ashbrook Center, of four highly regarded websites on the origin of the Constitution. He has received many teaching, scholarly, and leadership awards including admission to Phi Beta Kappa and the Howard White Award for Teaching Excellence at Pepperdine University. He currently serves on the National Advisory Council for the Walter and Leonore Annenberg Presidential Learning Center through the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation.
Dan Monroe Dan Monroe is Associate Professor and John C. Griswold Distinguished Professor of History at Millikin University. Monroe specializes in American History, and has given regular talks on Lincoln throughout the Midwest. He is the author of three books: The Republican Vision of John Tyler (2003), At Home with Illinois’ Governors: A Social History of the Illinois Executive Mansion (2002), and Shapers of the Great Debate on the Civil War: A Biographical Dictionary (2005), with co-author Dr. Bruce Tap. He received the Heiligenstein Award for Teaching Excellence and was a fellow at the Virginia Historical Society and Lincoln Legal Papers. Monroe is currently working on his fourth book – a study of everyday life in the antebellum U.S. He has been a member of Millikin’s history department since 2006.
MorelLucas_062013 Lucas Morel is the Class of 1960 Professor of Ethics and Politics and Head of the Politics Department at Washington and Lee University. He teaches American government, political philosophy, constitutional law, black American politics, and politics and literature, with research interests in Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and Ralph Ellison. He received his Ph.D. and M.A. from the Claremont Graduate University and a B.A., cum laude, from Claremont McKenna College. Dr. Morel is a past president of the Abraham Lincoln Institute, trustee of the Supreme Court Historical Society, and board member of the Abraham Lincoln Association. He has consulted on exhibits at the Library of Congress on Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War.
_DSC0031 John Moser is professor of history at Ashland University, where he teaches courses on modern European, American and East Asian history. He did his undergraduate work at Ohio University, and has an M.A. and Ph.D. in history from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has published numerous works on subjects ranging from comic books to Japanese foreign policy. He is author of four books, the most recent of which is The Global Great Depression and the Coming of World War II (Paradigm 2015). He is also the author of Right Turn: John T. Flynn and the Transformation of American Liberalism (New York University Press 2005) and Twisting the Lion’s Tail: American Anglophobia between the World Wars (New York University Press 1999).
 Moser-Monica-076 Monica Moser is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh. Prior to joining the Ashbrook Center staff, Monica worked as a financial coordinator for an orthodontist for 13 years. In her position as Teacher Program Coordinator for the Ashbrook Center, Monica assists with the logistics of various teacher programs across the country.
 peter_myers Peter C. Myers is Professor of Political Science, specializing in political philosophy and U.S. constitutional law, at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. He earned his B.A. in Political Science from Northwestern University and his Ph.D. in Political Science from Loyola University Chicago. His Ph.D. dissertation, “John Locke on the Naturalness of Rights,” received the American Political Science Association’s Leo Strauss Award for the Best Doctoral Dissertation in the Field of Political Philosophy in 1992. He is the author of two books: Our Only Star and Compass: Locke on the Struggle for Political Rationality (1998) and Frederick Douglass: Race and the Rebirth of American Liberalism (2008). He has published articles, chapters, and book reviews in the fields of liberal political philosophy, American literature, and American political thought, including a chapter on Martin Luther King, Jr., in the History of American Political Thought anthology edited by Bryan-Paul Frost and Ashland University’s Jeffrey Sikkenga, and an article on Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln in the May 2010 issue of the American Political Science Review. He is currently researching a book on the idea of color-blindness in American political thought.
Faculty - Mac Owens Mackubin T. Owens is dean of academics and professor of military strategy at the Institute of World Politics. Previously, he held a professorship in National Security Affairs at the United States Naval War College, where he was also Associate Dean of Academics for Electives and Directed Research. He is a Senior Fellow of the Foreign Policy Research Institute (FPRI) in Philadelphia, and editor of Orbis, FPRI’s quarterly journal. He specializes in the planning of US strategy and forces, especially naval and power projection forces; the political economy of national security; national security organization; strategic geography; energy security; and American civil-military relations. He has taught electives on The American Founding, Strategy and Policy of the American Civil War, The Statesmanship of Abraham Lincoln, Sea Power and Maritime Strategy, Strategy and Geography, and US Civil-Military Relations.
 Img0061_1 Christian A. Pascarella is the director of the Master of Arts in American History and Government. An alumnus of the Florida State University, he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Social Sciences Education in 1997. Upon graduation, he returned to his hometown of Boca Raton, Florida, where he taught Advanced Placement United States History at his alma mater, Spanish River Community High School. In addition to his classroom duties, Chris was involved in the planning of the district-wide American history curriculum and the training of new AP teachers for the School District of Palm Beach County. He coordinated the development and operation of Spanish River High’s partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History to create a four-year American studies magnet program at the school. He has also served as a reader for the College Board’s Advanced Placement exam.
JoePostell Joseph Postell is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, where he teaches courses on American political institutions, American political thought, and administrative law. His research focuses primarily on regulation, administrative law, and the administrative state. He is the editor, with Bradley C.S. Watson, of Rediscovering Political Economy and with Johnathan O’Neill, of Toward an American Conservatism: Constitutional Conservatism During the Progressive Era. He is currently completing a book on the administrative state and American constitutionalism, and editing a reader of primary sources on conservative thought during the early 20th century. He also contributes frequently to the Liberty Fund’s Library of Law and Liberty website on political and legal thought.
pullin Eric Pullin is Associate Professor of History and Asian Studies at Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin. He earned a B.A. in history from Rockford College, an M.A. in history from Northern Illinois University, an A.M. in Labor and Industrial Relations from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a Ph.D. in history from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Professor Pullin’s primary teaching and research interests address the international relations between India and the United States during the 20th century. He also teaches courses on the History of India, the History of the United States, Western Heritage, Global Heritage, and the History of Dictionaries.
Sands S12_0 Eric Sands is Associate Professor of Government at Berry College in Mount Berry, Georgia, where he received the SGA Outstanding Faculty Award in the Spring of 2009. Dr. Sands has published a book, American Public Philosophy and the Mystery of Lincolnism (University of Missouri Press, 2009) that examines the public philosophy of Abraham Lincoln and how the development of Lincoln’s ideas affected the politics of Reconstruction. He has also published articles in Perspectives on Political Science, PS: Political Science & Politics, The Encyclopedia of U.S. Campaigns, Elections, and Electoral Behavior, and The Encyclopedia of the Supreme Court. Dr. Sands has served as an Annual Fellow for the Jack Miller Center and is currently an Academic Partner for the Bill of Rights Institute. He earned his Ph.D. in Government from the University of Virginia.
GregSchneiderNEW Gregory L. Schneider is Professor of History at Emporia State University, where he has taught since 1998. He teaches courses in modern American history, the 1960s, diplomatic history, the history of railroads, and the history of conservatism. His research interests lie in the history of American conservatism. He has published five books: Cadres for Conservatism: Young Americans for Freedom and the Rise of the Contemporary Right (NYU Press, 1999); Conservatism in America since 1930: A Reader (NYU Press, 2003); Equality, Decadence and Modernity: The Collected Essays of Stephen J. Tonsor (ISI Books, 2005); The Conservative Century: From Reaction to Revolution (Rowman & Littlefield, 2008); and Rock Island Requiem: The Collapse of a Mighty Fine Line (University Press of Kansas, 2013).
002 Jason Stevens Jason Stevens, Visiting Assistant Professor, joined Ashland University in 2011. Previously he served as an adjunct instructor at the University of Akron – Wayne College, North Central State College, and the University of Dallas. He teaches political thought and history courses with fields of expertise in the American Founding, Abraham Lincoln, and political philosophy. He received his B.A. from Ashland University and his M.A. and Ph.D. (ABD) in politics from the University of Dallas, Institute of Philosophic Studies.
DSC_0434 Stephen Tootle is Professor of History at the College of the Sequoias in Visalia, California. Professor Tootle received his history degrees from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo (B.A., 1996), Fresno State (M.A., 1997), and Ohio University (Ph.D., 2004). Tootle taught American political history, American intellectual history, and U.S. foreign policy at the University of Northern Colorado and Georgia State before moving back to his hometown to start a family in 2007. His reviews, articles, and essays have appeared in the Claremont Review of Books, the Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, the History News Network, and his hometown newspaper. He is married with two young sons, Otis and Isaac. He serves as an Elder at Visalia’s First Presbyterian Church, on the Board of the College of the Sequoias Foundation, as the Vice Chairman of the Republican Party in Tulare County, is the advisor for the College Honor Society and the College Republicans, administrates a speaker series on individual liberty, and recently concluded a term as a Leadership Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington D.C.
david_tucker David Tucker is a Senior Fellow at the Ashbrook Center at Ashland University and Associate Director of the Master of Arts in American History and Government. Prior to joining Ashbrook, he taught for 15 years at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California and worked both in the Pentagon and overseas for the U.S. government. Prior to his government service, Tucker was a William Rainey Harper Fellow at the University of Chicago. Professor Tucker earned his Ph.D. in history at the Claremont Graduate School in 1981. His publications include The End of Intelligence: Espionage and State Power in the Information Age (Stanford, 2014); Illuminating the Dark Arts of War: Terrorism, Sabotage, and Subversion in Homeland Security and the New Conflict (Continuum, 2012); and Enlightened Republicanism: A Study of Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia (Lexington Books, 2007), as well as other books and articles on military affairs and American history.
1weaver20497-006-589x394_0 Jace Weaver is the Franklin Professor of Native American Studies and Religion, director of the Institute of Native American Studies, and Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of Georgia. Dr. Weaver’s work in Native American Studies is highly interdisciplinary, though focusing primarily on three areas: religious traditions, literature, and law. He is the author or editor of ten books, including That the People Might Live: Native American Literatures and Native American Community, Other Words: American Indian Literature, Law, and Culture, and Turtle Goes to War: Of Military Commissions, the Constitution and American Indian Memory. American Indian Literary Nationalism, written with Robert Warrior, Craig Womack, and Simon Ortiz, won the 2007 Bea Medicine Award for best book in American Indian Studies from the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies and the Native American Literature Symposium. His most recent work is the essay collection Notes from a Miner’s Canary.
Dr. Jonathan White Jonathan W. White is Associate Professor of American Studies and a senior fellow at the Center for American Studies at Christopher Newport University. He is the author of several books and articles about Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War. His recent book, Emancipation, the Union Army, and the Reelection of Abraham Lincoln, was selected by Civil War Monitor as one of the best books of 2014, was a Finalist for the Lincoln Prize and the Jefferson Davis Prize, and won the Abraham Lincoln Institute’s 2015 Book Prize.
scott-yenor Scott Yenor is Professor of Political Science and Chair of the Department of Political Science at Boise State University. He teaches courses in political philosophy and has also published on a variety of subjects, including the Scottish Enlightenment, the philosophic status of revealed religion, American literature, and the family in modern political thought. His most recent book, Family Politics: The Idea of Marriage in Modern Political Thought, was published in 2011.

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